XLT 4x4 SuperCrew 5 ft. box 127 in. WB
2019 Ford Ranger

2019 Ranger Photos
CRACKENBACK, Australia – This isn't the story I wanted to write. I was sitting on the shores of Lake Jindabyne in the Snowy Mountain region of Southeast Australia, having just finished the first of what would be many off-road runs in a 2019 Ford Ranger Raptor, one of the most anticipated vehicles in the world. This is about as close to an automotive dream come true as I've had, but this story isn't about a truck that is heading to our shores. Rather, it's about a truck that isn't. I had an inkling before making the trip down under, but now I was certain: This is the truck Ford should've led with. This is the truck that America needs right now. And it's the one that Ford confirmed we won't get anytime soon. Last year I drove a Ranger down in New Zealand – a Wildtrak model with a 3.2-liter diesel. It was a great truck to drive, but didn't have the legit off-road capabilities I was hoping for. Like the Chevy Colorado ZR2 I drove at our Tech of the Year awards, or the Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro I drove all around the Pacific Northwest. Those trucks showed me what the Ranger could be. And the Ford F-150 Raptor has proven over and over that Ford knows how to do an off-road truck right. Why couldn't the Ranger become the mid-sized, off-road truck of my dreams? And then it seemed like my dreams had been answered. Ford announced it was developing a Ranger Raptor. The fast, capable little brother to the F-150 Raptor that could go places the larger truck couldn't, looking completely badass while doing so. Finding out that it would not be coming to America was disappointing, but instead of sulking, I flew down to Australia to drive the truck we wouldn't be getting. My first experience behind the wheel was a couple of hours into our five-hour drive from Canberra to Crackenback. It's a lonely stretch of road, but it let the Ranger Raptor attempt its first test: passing a slow-moving semi on an otherwise straight and open road. I turned on my blinker, pushed the accelerator to the floor and... nothing. Well, not nothing, but it felt that way for five agonizing seconds, until we had gained enough speed to pass the semi in front of us. The 2.0 liter four-cylinder twin-turbo diesel, which puts out only 210 horsepower but an impressive 369 pound-feet of torque, feels good at lower speeds but lethargic on the highway, especially in the Normal driving mode. Switch the driving mode from Normal to Sport however, and some of that changes. The ten-speed automatic transmission, shared with the F-150 Raptor, holds onto gears and aggressively downshifts, giving the illusion of more power. Illusion or not, it works. It helps tighten up the steering, too, which feels floaty and disconnected in Normal. Sport makes the steering feel tighter and more accurate. We eventually left the flat roads of the plains behind, …
Full Review
CRACKENBACK, Australia – This isn't the story I wanted to write. I was sitting on the shores of Lake Jindabyne in the Snowy Mountain region of Southeast Australia, having just finished the first of what would be many off-road runs in a 2019 Ford Ranger Raptor, one of the most anticipated vehicles in the world. This is about as close to an automotive dream come true as I've had, but this story isn't about a truck that is heading to our shores. Rather, it's about a truck that isn't. I had an inkling before making the trip down under, but now I was certain: This is the truck Ford should've led with. This is the truck that America needs right now. And it's the one that Ford confirmed we won't get anytime soon. Last year I drove a Ranger down in New Zealand – a Wildtrak model with a 3.2-liter diesel. It was a great truck to drive, but didn't have the legit off-road capabilities I was hoping for. Like the Chevy Colorado ZR2 I drove at our Tech of the Year awards, or the Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro I drove all around the Pacific Northwest. Those trucks showed me what the Ranger could be. And the Ford F-150 Raptor has proven over and over that Ford knows how to do an off-road truck right. Why couldn't the Ranger become the mid-sized, off-road truck of my dreams? And then it seemed like my dreams had been answered. Ford announced it was developing a Ranger Raptor. The fast, capable little brother to the F-150 Raptor that could go places the larger truck couldn't, looking completely badass while doing so. Finding out that it would not be coming to America was disappointing, but instead of sulking, I flew down to Australia to drive the truck we wouldn't be getting. My first experience behind the wheel was a couple of hours into our five-hour drive from Canberra to Crackenback. It's a lonely stretch of road, but it let the Ranger Raptor attempt its first test: passing a slow-moving semi on an otherwise straight and open road. I turned on my blinker, pushed the accelerator to the floor and... nothing. Well, not nothing, but it felt that way for five agonizing seconds, until we had gained enough speed to pass the semi in front of us. The 2.0 liter four-cylinder twin-turbo diesel, which puts out only 210 horsepower but an impressive 369 pound-feet of torque, feels good at lower speeds but lethargic on the highway, especially in the Normal driving mode. Switch the driving mode from Normal to Sport however, and some of that changes. The ten-speed automatic transmission, shared with the F-150 Raptor, holds onto gears and aggressively downshifts, giving the illusion of more power. Illusion or not, it works. It helps tighten up the steering, too, which feels floaty and disconnected in Normal. Sport makes the steering feel tighter and more accurate. We eventually left the flat roads of the plains behind, …
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Retail Price

$34,115 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

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Engine 2.3LI-4
MPG City / Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 10-spd w/OD
Power 270 @ 5500 rpm
Drivetrain four-wheel
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