GT Premium 2dr Convertible
2019 Ford Mustang

2019 Mustang Photos
8
Autoblog Rating

An even burlier V8 provides robust thrills with a bombastic soundtrack. Some automatic transmission glitches and cheap interior materials annoy but don’t stop the fun.

Industry
9
The late Woodward Avenue street racing legend Joe Ruggirello would have enjoyed ripping through the gears of this supercharged 710-horsepower 2019 Roush Mustang Stage 3. After a few good hard launches and some violent 7,500-rpm power shifts, he probably would have said something like, "Jack Roush still knows how to build a fast Mustang, but mine would have blown its frickin' doors off." In 1975, when Jack Roush was a championship-winning Pro Stock drag racer, he built Ruggirello the meanest street Mustang in America, a little Mustang II with a monster 505-cubic-inch big block and other Pro Stock spec components. Nicknamed "Sudden Death" by Hot Rod Magazine, the silver hatchback with massive 13-inch-wide Firestone slicks was good for 10-second quarter-mile times. It had already become a legend by the time Brock Yates featured the Ford in a 1976 issue of Car and Driver. "If Detroit is the capital of street racing — which most insiders agree upon — and nobody there can beat the Mustang II, is this not the quickest street car of all?" Yates wrote in his famous exposé on Detroit's street racing culture. Jack Roush, best known for his expansive Roush-Fenway NASCAR enterprise, opened Roush Performance in 1995, and he's been tuning factory-fresh Mustangs in Plymouth Township, Mich., ever since. Much like Shelby and Saleen, who had come before, Roush sells finished cars and individual speed parts. Today, Roush Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3 Mustangs can be purchased from hundreds of authorized Ford dealers around the United States and Canada. Many of those dealers also sell Roush's extensive line of speed parts, accessories and crate engines, which are also available online at roushperformance.com. Stage 3 gets the supercharger Before it became a Roush Stage 3 Mustang, our Ruby Red test car began life as a nearly loaded 2019 Ford Mustang GT with a six-speed manual transmission and a $48,335 sticker price. The Stage 3 setup is the hottest, which for $22,925 includes the same 2.65-liter TVS positive displacement supercharger Ford sells over the counter for the Coyote 5.0-liter V8 engine. It uses Eaton's new R2650 rotating assembly with rotors featuring 170 degrees of twist (up from 160 degrees) for better sealing and bigger bearings, and thicker timing gears for more durability. The kit makes 12 psi of boost and is emissions legal in all 50 states. Roush says the blower cranks up the engine's power from its stock 460 hp and 420 lb-ft of torque to 710 hp at 7,250 rpm, and 610 lb-ft of torque at 4,500 rpm. Surprisingly the Mustang's stock clutch is untouched by Roush, but the Stage 3 Package does include beefier "extreme duty" half shafts, so they don't twist 170 degrees the first time you drop the hammer. The Mustang's powertrain feels robust, like you can confidently stomp on it without utilizing the Roush Powertrain Warranty, which covers the axle shafts and other bits for 5 years or 60,000 miles. This is important since the Roush RS3 can blaze its …
Full Review
The late Woodward Avenue street racing legend Joe Ruggirello would have enjoyed ripping through the gears of this supercharged 710-horsepower 2019 Roush Mustang Stage 3. After a few good hard launches and some violent 7,500-rpm power shifts, he probably would have said something like, "Jack Roush still knows how to build a fast Mustang, but mine would have blown its frickin' doors off." In 1975, when Jack Roush was a championship-winning Pro Stock drag racer, he built Ruggirello the meanest street Mustang in America, a little Mustang II with a monster 505-cubic-inch big block and other Pro Stock spec components. Nicknamed "Sudden Death" by Hot Rod Magazine, the silver hatchback with massive 13-inch-wide Firestone slicks was good for 10-second quarter-mile times. It had already become a legend by the time Brock Yates featured the Ford in a 1976 issue of Car and Driver. "If Detroit is the capital of street racing — which most insiders agree upon — and nobody there can beat the Mustang II, is this not the quickest street car of all?" Yates wrote in his famous exposé on Detroit's street racing culture. Jack Roush, best known for his expansive Roush-Fenway NASCAR enterprise, opened Roush Performance in 1995, and he's been tuning factory-fresh Mustangs in Plymouth Township, Mich., ever since. Much like Shelby and Saleen, who had come before, Roush sells finished cars and individual speed parts. Today, Roush Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3 Mustangs can be purchased from hundreds of authorized Ford dealers around the United States and Canada. Many of those dealers also sell Roush's extensive line of speed parts, accessories and crate engines, which are also available online at roushperformance.com. Stage 3 gets the supercharger Before it became a Roush Stage 3 Mustang, our Ruby Red test car began life as a nearly loaded 2019 Ford Mustang GT with a six-speed manual transmission and a $48,335 sticker price. The Stage 3 setup is the hottest, which for $22,925 includes the same 2.65-liter TVS positive displacement supercharger Ford sells over the counter for the Coyote 5.0-liter V8 engine. It uses Eaton's new R2650 rotating assembly with rotors featuring 170 degrees of twist (up from 160 degrees) for better sealing and bigger bearings, and thicker timing gears for more durability. The kit makes 12 psi of boost and is emissions legal in all 50 states. Roush says the blower cranks up the engine's power from its stock 460 hp and 420 lb-ft of torque to 710 hp at 7,250 rpm, and 610 lb-ft of torque at 4,500 rpm. Surprisingly the Mustang's stock clutch is untouched by Roush, but the Stage 3 Package does include beefier "extreme duty" half shafts, so they don't twist 170 degrees the first time you drop the hammer. The Mustang's powertrain feels robust, like you can confidently stomp on it without utilizing the Roush Powertrain Warranty, which covers the axle shafts and other bits for 5 years or 60,000 miles. This is important since the Roush RS3 can blaze its …
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Retail Price

$44,855 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$2,997 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 5.0LV-8
MPG 14 City / 23 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd man w/OD
Power 460 @ 7000 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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