i xDrive 2dr All-wheel Drive Coupe
2019 BMW M850

2019 M850 Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
8

A fine touring car that drives bigger than its competitors — cars we generally find more compelling than this BMW. That said, any well-heeled would not be disappointed in this fast, comfortable, eye-catching GT.

Industry
8.5
ESTORIL, Portugal — It's been nearly two decades since the BMW 8-Series filled driveways with its grandiosity and elegantly oversized persona. The top-dog 850 CSi was a two-ton cruiser motivated by a naturally-aspirated 5.6-liter V12 that churned a then-remarkable 380 horsepower. Wow, how the world of performance cars has evolved. Flash forward to present day, and the new 2019 BMW M850i xDrive offers a future-forward translation of the shark-nosed 2+2 from yesteryear, but little else carries over. Sure, it's still got a curb weight in excess of two tons (4,478 pounds, to be precise), but it also benefits from a considerably stiffer chassis and the thrust of a twin-turbo 4.4-liter producing 523 horsepower and a wheel-spinning 553 lb-ft of torque. Those 20-inch hoops are less likely to slide due to BMW's standard xDrive all-wheel drive system. I've traveled to the 2.6-mile Autódromo do Estoril near the west coast of Portugal to track test the new BMW 8 Series, which initially might seem a mismatch to the circuit's tight esses and bends. Decked out in a generally harmonious blend of graceful lines and aggressive bits (including some disappointingly non-functional vents and ducts), the new 8 Series, at least in non-M form, appears to lean more towards luxe than lightweight. Though the $124,500 Mercedes-Benz S-Class Coupe takes the cake for lavish interiors, the $111,900 BMW counters with a more austere, modern overall treatment that still sports some cushy bits, like the Merino leather seats and generous swaths of cowhide across the dashboard and door panels. In other words, the Mercedes is more lavish, but this BMW features a more functional aesthetic and a more focused sense of performance. The M850i was developed alongside BMW's M8 GTE race car; though the street car can't compete with its track counterpart's wispy 2,689-pound curb weight, it does manage an eye-opening 0-to-60 mph acceleration time of 3.6 seconds. That sprint bests Benz's S 560 4MATIC's time of 4.5 seconds, and feels rather feisty as it launches onto Estoril's freshly repaved surface. The 8's rear-steering system is a bit perceptible during sharp turn-ins below 45 mph, when it countersteers to aid maneuverability. But that's not necessarily a bad thing because it manages to change direction better than any two-ton-plus car has any right to. There's lots of grip from the 245 mm front/275 mm rear Bridgestone rubber, and though the 8's weight is perceptible on the track, once you get over the initial shift in mass it manages to find enough sure-footedness to hang on to corners rather tenaciously. Much of this stability comes from a concert of aids including a rear electronic differential, electronic roll stabilization, and individually applied brake intervention. Aiding corner exit is BMW's all-wheel drive system, which essentially works as a rear-drive configuration that only applies power to the front wheels when necessary. The resulting distribution lends the 8 Series a balanced, hunkered down feeling in corners that avoids understeer-prone tendencies of most all-wheel-drive setups. Sure, it's ponderousness compared to significantly smaller, lighter …
Full Review
ESTORIL, Portugal — It's been nearly two decades since the BMW 8-Series filled driveways with its grandiosity and elegantly oversized persona. The top-dog 850 CSi was a two-ton cruiser motivated by a naturally-aspirated 5.6-liter V12 that churned a then-remarkable 380 horsepower. Wow, how the world of performance cars has evolved. Flash forward to present day, and the new 2019 BMW M850i xDrive offers a future-forward translation of the shark-nosed 2+2 from yesteryear, but little else carries over. Sure, it's still got a curb weight in excess of two tons (4,478 pounds, to be precise), but it also benefits from a considerably stiffer chassis and the thrust of a twin-turbo 4.4-liter producing 523 horsepower and a wheel-spinning 553 lb-ft of torque. Those 20-inch hoops are less likely to slide due to BMW's standard xDrive all-wheel drive system. I've traveled to the 2.6-mile Autódromo do Estoril near the west coast of Portugal to track test the new BMW 8 Series, which initially might seem a mismatch to the circuit's tight esses and bends. Decked out in a generally harmonious blend of graceful lines and aggressive bits (including some disappointingly non-functional vents and ducts), the new 8 Series, at least in non-M form, appears to lean more towards luxe than lightweight. Though the $124,500 Mercedes-Benz S-Class Coupe takes the cake for lavish interiors, the $111,900 BMW counters with a more austere, modern overall treatment that still sports some cushy bits, like the Merino leather seats and generous swaths of cowhide across the dashboard and door panels. In other words, the Mercedes is more lavish, but this BMW features a more functional aesthetic and a more focused sense of performance. The M850i was developed alongside BMW's M8 GTE race car; though the street car can't compete with its track counterpart's wispy 2,689-pound curb weight, it does manage an eye-opening 0-to-60 mph acceleration time of 3.6 seconds. That sprint bests Benz's S 560 4MATIC's time of 4.5 seconds, and feels rather feisty as it launches onto Estoril's freshly repaved surface. The 8's rear-steering system is a bit perceptible during sharp turn-ins below 45 mph, when it countersteers to aid maneuverability. But that's not necessarily a bad thing because it manages to change direction better than any two-ton-plus car has any right to. There's lots of grip from the 245 mm front/275 mm rear Bridgestone rubber, and though the 8's weight is perceptible on the track, once you get over the initial shift in mass it manages to find enough sure-footedness to hang on to corners rather tenaciously. Much of this stability comes from a concert of aids including a rear electronic differential, electronic roll stabilization, and individually applied brake intervention. Aiding corner exit is BMW's all-wheel drive system, which essentially works as a rear-drive configuration that only applies power to the front wheels when necessary. The resulting distribution lends the 8 Series a balanced, hunkered down feeling in corners that avoids understeer-prone tendencies of most all-wheel-drive setups. Sure, it's ponderousness compared to significantly smaller, lighter …
Hide Full Review

Retail Price

$111,900 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$5,400 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
See Local Pricing
Engine 4.4LV-8
MPG 18 City / 25 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 8-spd w/OD
Power 523 @ 5500 rpm
Drivetrain xDrive all wheel
Smart Buy Program is powered by TRUECar Logo