2018 Ford Edge Reviews

2018 Edge New Car Test Drive

The following review is for a 2017 Model Year. There may be minor changes to current model you are looking at.

Introduction

Since its introduction 10 years ago, the Ford Edge has become a big hit, with models competing in price and equipment with other crossover SUVs ranging from the Honda CR-V and Hyundai Santa Fe, to the BMW X3, Audi Q5, and Lexus RX. 

Its popularity seems to be because the Edge handsome, has a wide range of power options, handles well, and includes many features. It hasn't gotten lost in the full Ford crossover lineup, having more cargo space than an Escape, but less seating than an Explorer or Flex. 

The 2017 Ford Edge is unchanged from 2016, except for a new cold-weather package and new 20-inch wheels. 

The Ford Edge has three engines to choose from, all using a 6-speed automatic transmission. First is a mostly perfectly adequate front-wheel-drive turbocharged 2.0-liter four cylinder making 245 horsepower that can tow up to 3500 pounds. The 3.5-liter V6 making 280 horsepower doesn't cost much more. The twin-turbocharged 2.7-liter V6 is strong and confident with 315 horsepower. 

All-wheel drive is available. The system constantly sends some power to the rear wheels, and adds significant weight, cutting fuel mileage by two highway miles per gallon. Some systems nowadays send all the power to the front wheels until it's needed for traction at the rear, helping fuel mileage. 

The base turbo four engine with front-wheel drive is EPA-rated at 20 miles per gallon City, 29 Highway, and 24 Combined; all-wheel drive is 20/27/23 mpg. The front-wheel-drive 3.5-liter V6 gets 17/26/20 mpg, while the 2.7-liter twin-turbo V6 with all-wheel drive only, gets 17/24/19 mpg. The V6 engines need Premium fuel. The turbocharged four-cylinder should have it; but the engine won't be damaged with Regular 87 octane gas, but the horsepower will drop to about 220. 

In safety tests, the NHTSA gives the Edge five stars overall, with four stars in rollover resistance. The IIHS gives Edge its top Good score in every test but the small-overlap frontal test, which simulates hitting a telephone pole. It rates only Acceptable in that test, despite an additional glovebox airbag designed to protect the passenger's knees. 

A rearview camera is standard, but most other safety equipment is optional, even on the expensive Titanium model. That includes inflating rear seatbelts, lane-keep assist, forward-collision warning with brake support, adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitors, and a 180-degree front camera with washer. 

Lineup

The 2017 Ford Edge comes standard with front-wheel drive and the turbocharged four-cylinder engine. All-wheel drive is optional. 

Edge SE ($28,950) includes cloth upholstery, power features, climate and cruise control, a rearview camera tilt/telescope steering, and AM/FM/CD audio with Bluetooth audio streaming. Options include LED headlamps and parking assist. 

Edge SEL ($31,790) adds dual-zone climate control, power front seats, satellite radio, rear parking sensors, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and heated mirrors. Options include 3.5-liter V6, Sync 3, navigation, heated seats, and premium audio. 

Edge Titanium ($35,600) is upgraded with leather-trimmed upholstery, 12-speaker Sony audio system with HD Radio, ambient lighting, heated front seats, and a hands-free tailgate system. Options include 3.5-liter V6, panoramic roof, 180-degree front camera with washer, leather seats, ventilated front seats, remote start, heated rear seats, second-row inflatable seatbelts, and Active Park Assist. Adaptive cruise control with forward-collision warnings and automatic braking are packaged together as an option. 

Edge Sport ($40,900) is equipped with the twin-turbo V6 and all-wheel drive. Distinguished by blacked-out trim, Sport models also include active noise cancellation, adaptive steering, 21-inch wheels. 

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