LS All-wheel Drive
2018 Chevrolet Equinox

MSRP ?

$27,260
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings ?

$1,706
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EngineEngine 1.5LI-4
MPGMPG 24 City / 30 Hwy
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2018 Equinox Overview

Since 2010, Chevrolet has been limping the second-generation Equinox along, doing the bare minimum to keep it competitive in the compact crossover segment. But for 2018, Chevy finally gave the Equinox a ground-up redesign, with a lighter body (by 400 lbs) and chassis, and three new turbocharged engines. A turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder serves as the base engine, and a 1.6-liter turbodiesel that will be available later this summer will be the economy leader. In-between is a 2.0-liter four-cylinder gas engine introduced just recently. It's this example that we got to try out in Nashville, Tennessee, to find out if the new Equinox is worth your consideration. This new 2.0-liter unit isn't as powerful as the 3.6-liter V6 it replaces, making 252 horsepower as opposed to 301. Torque is down, too, with 260 pound-feet instead of 272. But what it loses in power, it gains in fuel economy. The old V6 only managed 17 mpg city and 24 mpg highway with front-wheel drive, and the all-wheel-drive version got 1 mpg less in each category. The new 2.0-liter four-cylinder gets 22 mpg in the city and 29 mpg on the highway with front-wheel drive. Going with all-wheel drive drops the highway number by 1 mpg. Compared with the rest of the segment, the Equinox's 2.0-liter engine fares well, more so than the already available 1.5-liter. Only the Ford Escape Titanium with its own 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder with 245 horsepower and 275 pound-feet of torque comes close to the "big-displacement" Equinox. The front-drive version of that Escape also matches the Chevy for fuel economy, but the all-wheel drive version loses out with 20 mpg city and 27 mpg highway. The 2.0-liter Equinox also outguns competitors such as the Mazda CX-5, Toyota RAV4, Honda CR-V, and Nissan Rogue – which all make less than 200 horsepower. That's not an entirely fair comparison, though, since the $30,090 2.0-liter Equinox costs roughly $6,000 more than any of those less-powerful crossovers. The $24,525 1.5-liter Equinox is a closer competitor, and its 170 horsepower and 200 pound-feet of torque are square in the middle of the pack. In practice, the 2.0-liter engine feels well-suited for this crossover. It doesn't turn the Equinox into a tall hot hatch, but you'll never struggle to pass people or get up to speed on highway ramps. Power delivery is smooth without much turbo lag. The engine is also quiet around town and when cruising on the highway, but at high rpm, it elicits some thrumming noises that permeate the otherwise relatively quiet cabin. It's unlikely many drivers will frequently experience high rpm, though, since the 9-speed automatic transmission does everything it can to keep the engine turning slowly. This of course means plenty of upshifts to keep the needle from swinging too far up the tachometer, but every shift is silky smooth and nearly imperceptible. Where the transmission could use some improvement is in shift speed. It takes a moment for it to wake up and downshift when you demand more giddy-up, …
Full Review

2018 Equinox Overview

Since 2010, Chevrolet has been limping the second-generation Equinox along, doing the bare minimum to keep it competitive in the compact crossover segment. But for 2018, Chevy finally gave the Equinox a ground-up redesign, with a lighter body (by 400 lbs) and chassis, and three new turbocharged engines. A turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder serves as the base engine, and a 1.6-liter turbodiesel that will be available later this summer will be the economy leader. In-between is a 2.0-liter four-cylinder gas engine introduced just recently. It's this example that we got to try out in Nashville, Tennessee, to find out if the new Equinox is worth your consideration. This new 2.0-liter unit isn't as powerful as the 3.6-liter V6 it replaces, making 252 horsepower as opposed to 301. Torque is down, too, with 260 pound-feet instead of 272. But what it loses in power, it gains in fuel economy. The old V6 only managed 17 mpg city and 24 mpg highway with front-wheel drive, and the all-wheel-drive version got 1 mpg less in each category. The new 2.0-liter four-cylinder gets 22 mpg in the city and 29 mpg on the highway with front-wheel drive. Going with all-wheel drive drops the highway number by 1 mpg. Compared with the rest of the segment, the Equinox's 2.0-liter engine fares well, more so than the already available 1.5-liter. Only the Ford Escape Titanium with its own 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder with 245 horsepower and 275 pound-feet of torque comes close to the "big-displacement" Equinox. The front-drive version of that Escape also matches the Chevy for fuel economy, but the all-wheel drive version loses out with 20 mpg city and 27 mpg highway. The 2.0-liter Equinox also outguns competitors such as the Mazda CX-5, Toyota RAV4, Honda CR-V, and Nissan Rogue – which all make less than 200 horsepower. That's not an entirely fair comparison, though, since the $30,090 2.0-liter Equinox costs roughly $6,000 more than any of those less-powerful crossovers. The $24,525 1.5-liter Equinox is a closer competitor, and its 170 horsepower and 200 pound-feet of torque are square in the middle of the pack. In practice, the 2.0-liter engine feels well-suited for this crossover. It doesn't turn the Equinox into a tall hot hatch, but you'll never struggle to pass people or get up to speed on highway ramps. Power delivery is smooth without much turbo lag. The engine is also quiet around town and when cruising on the highway, but at high rpm, it elicits some thrumming noises that permeate the otherwise relatively quiet cabin. It's unlikely many drivers will frequently experience high rpm, though, since the 9-speed automatic transmission does everything it can to keep the engine turning slowly. This of course means plenty of upshifts to keep the needle from swinging too far up the tachometer, but every shift is silky smooth and nearly imperceptible. Where the transmission could use some improvement is in shift speed. It takes a moment for it to wake up and downshift when you demand more giddy-up, …Hide Full Review