EX-L w/Navigation 4dr Front-wheel Drive
2017 Honda HR-V

2017 HR-V Photos
The Honda HR-V subcompact crossover, introduced for 2016, is one size smaller than the CR-V, and is based on the versatile and economical Fit. It looks a bit sportier than the CR-V, and more like an SUV than the swoopy and aerodynamic Fit. It's essentially unchanged for 2017.

There is one engine, a 1.8-liter four-cylinder that makes 141 horsepower and 127 pound-feet of torque. Front-wheel drive is standard, all-wheel drive is optional.

The HR-V is comfortable to drive, and it can be fun, but it isn't what we'd call sporty. Its versatility and economy are what make it a great choice in a subcompact crossover. Competitors include the funky Fiat 500X, sporty Mazda CX 3, and the Chevy Trax that shares a platform with the upscale Buick Encore.

Most models come with a continuously variable transmission (CVT), but a six-speed manual is available with front-wheel drive. The CVT gets better gas mileage, its reason for being, though it's lame from a driving standpoint; it's EPA-rated at 28/34 miles per gallon City/Highway, or 31 mpg Combined, with front-wheel drive. That essentially ties with the best in class Mazda CX-3 that gets a half-mpg better.

The HR-V was carefully designed with versatility in mind. The cabin is clean and well organized, with a nice center stack with an optional big display. The roofline is curved for more headroom. The rear passengers have plenty of hip and legroom. The HR-V steals the popular features of the Fit, like the fold-flat 60/40 rear seat, and the Magic fold-flat front seats. A flat cargo space behind the front seats, and a dropped front seatback, makes it like a minivan. With all-wheel drive and a roof rack, it'll do anything.
Full Review

The Honda HR-V subcompact crossover, introduced for 2016, is one size smaller than the CR-V, and is based on the versatile and economical Fit. It looks a bit sportier than the CR-V, and more like an SUV than the swoopy and aerodynamic Fit. It's essentially unchanged for 2017.

There is one engine, a 1.8-liter four-cylinder that makes 141 horsepower and 127 pound-feet of torque. Front-wheel drive is standard, all-wheel drive is optional.

The HR-V is comfortable to drive, and it can be fun, but it isn't what we'd call sporty. Its versatility and economy are what make it a great choice in a subcompact crossover. Competitors include the funky Fiat 500X, sporty Mazda CX 3, and the Chevy Trax that shares a platform with the upscale Buick Encore.

Most models come with a continuously variable transmission (CVT), but a six-speed manual is available with front-wheel drive. The CVT gets better gas mileage, its reason for being, though it's lame from a driving standpoint; it's EPA-rated at 28/34 miles per gallon City/Highway, or 31 mpg Combined, with front-wheel drive. That essentially ties with the best in class Mazda CX-3 that gets a half-mpg better.

The HR-V was carefully designed with versatility in mind. The cabin is clean and well organized, with a nice center stack with an optional big display. The roofline is curved for more headroom. The rear passengers have plenty of hip and legroom. The HR-V steals the popular features of the Fit, like the fold-flat 60/40 rear seat, and the Magic fold-flat front seats. A flat cargo space behind the front seats, and a dropped front seatback, makes it like a minivan. With all-wheel drive and a roof rack, it'll do anything.
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Retail Price

$24,940 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 1.8LI-4
MPG 28 City / 34 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 2-spd CVT w/OD
Power 141 @ 6500 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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