TSI SEL 4-Door 4dr Front-wheel Drive Hatchback
2015 Volkswagen Golf

MSRP

$27,395
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
EngineEngine 1.8LI-4
MPGMPG 25 City / 36 Hwy
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2015 Golf Overview

The Waiting Is The Hardest Part Back in 2010, we attended the launch for the sixth-generation Volkswagen Golf GTD, an event set on the scenic roads of the cult car's natural habitat – southern Bavarian curving two-lanes complete with shocking views of the majestic Alps. We've now returned to the exact same location for the Mk7 GTD that will come to North America in – brace yourselves – mid-2015 as a 2016 model. It's like anticipation gone bad in light of the spoiled immediacy of today's Internet Age. On the very positive side, while the US never got the last GTD, at least we are assured of getting this one. And it's a better car than its predecessor, and better is better in our book, so the wait may be worth it depending on how rabid you are for a hot diesel Golf. Will our GTD be built in Puebla, Mexico, along with all other Mk7 Golf models bound for North America? That's a question VW experts couldn't yet answer for us. At our first opportunity, we jumped in this Tornado Red GTD equipped with the optional 18-inch Nogaro wheels that come with the optional Sport & Sound package. (Europe's standard wheel is the 17-inch Curitiba). Plunking down in the standard, GTI-style, Clark tartan-clad sport seats, gripping the sport steering wheel and palming the heritage golf-ball manual shift knob all seemed very familiar, as the appointments reminded us of our April drive in the new GTI. Push the clutch pedal, press the start button and enter the world of diesel hot hatchery. Push the clutch pedal, press the start button on the center console and prepare to enter the world of diesel hot hatchery. Well, not quite right away, since it takes about two seconds for the ignition to get the glow plugs... err... glowing. Even at idle, this 181-horsepower version of the VW's new EA288 2.0-liter TDI is rather less clackety-clack than the company's non-GTD TDI fours. That's a welcome dash of refinement in a model that will most likely carry a price tag of nearly $27,000 for a two-door, six-speed manual model – if indeed Volkswagen North America brings over the most basic configuration. Lucky us, this particular GTD is specced pretty perfectly for our tastes: Four doors, six-speed manual shifter, not too discomforting 18-inch wheels, and the Sport & Sound package. You'll be able to opt for a 19-inch Santiago wheelset, and they look good in those wells, but we'd prefer to preserve the car's everyday ride quality to keep things practical. Besides the 18-inch Nogaro alloys and 225/40 Bridgestone Potenzas, the Sport & Sound package includes VW's Driving Profile Selector (with Eco, Normal, Sport and Individual modes), ventilated compound brake discs with flashy red calipers, and a bit of active sound trickery that delivers either a normal or throatier soundtrack depending on a sensor in the engine compartment. Small, direct-injected diesels really do feel more at home with a good manual. When we had our shot …
Full Review

2015 Golf Overview

The Waiting Is The Hardest Part Back in 2010, we attended the launch for the sixth-generation Volkswagen Golf GTD, an event set on the scenic roads of the cult car's natural habitat – southern Bavarian curving two-lanes complete with shocking views of the majestic Alps. We've now returned to the exact same location for the Mk7 GTD that will come to North America in – brace yourselves – mid-2015 as a 2016 model. It's like anticipation gone bad in light of the spoiled immediacy of today's Internet Age. On the very positive side, while the US never got the last GTD, at least we are assured of getting this one. And it's a better car than its predecessor, and better is better in our book, so the wait may be worth it depending on how rabid you are for a hot diesel Golf. Will our GTD be built in Puebla, Mexico, along with all other Mk7 Golf models bound for North America? That's a question VW experts couldn't yet answer for us. At our first opportunity, we jumped in this Tornado Red GTD equipped with the optional 18-inch Nogaro wheels that come with the optional Sport & Sound package. (Europe's standard wheel is the 17-inch Curitiba). Plunking down in the standard, GTI-style, Clark tartan-clad sport seats, gripping the sport steering wheel and palming the heritage golf-ball manual shift knob all seemed very familiar, as the appointments reminded us of our April drive in the new GTI. Push the clutch pedal, press the start button and enter the world of diesel hot hatchery. Push the clutch pedal, press the start button on the center console and prepare to enter the world of diesel hot hatchery. Well, not quite right away, since it takes about two seconds for the ignition to get the glow plugs... err... glowing. Even at idle, this 181-horsepower version of the VW's new EA288 2.0-liter TDI is rather less clackety-clack than the company's non-GTD TDI fours. That's a welcome dash of refinement in a model that will most likely carry a price tag of nearly $27,000 for a two-door, six-speed manual model – if indeed Volkswagen North America brings over the most basic configuration. Lucky us, this particular GTD is specced pretty perfectly for our tastes: Four doors, six-speed manual shifter, not too discomforting 18-inch wheels, and the Sport & Sound package. You'll be able to opt for a 19-inch Santiago wheelset, and they look good in those wells, but we'd prefer to preserve the car's everyday ride quality to keep things practical. Besides the 18-inch Nogaro alloys and 225/40 Bridgestone Potenzas, the Sport & Sound package includes VW's Driving Profile Selector (with Eco, Normal, Sport and Individual modes), ventilated compound brake discs with flashy red calipers, and a bit of active sound trickery that delivers either a normal or throatier soundtrack depending on a sensor in the engine compartment. Small, direct-injected diesels really do feel more at home with a good manual. When we had our shot …Hide Full Review