2.5i Premium 4dr All-wheel Drive Sedan
2015 Subaru Legacy

MSRP ?

$23,495
Quick Quote

Smart Buy Avg. Savings ?

N/A
View Local Pricing
EngineEngine 2.5LH-4
MPGMPG 26 City / 36 Hwy
MoreMore View All Specs

2015 Legacy Overview

Subaru has a problem on its six-starred hands, but you wouldn't know it at first glance. Sales are up; in fact, the Japanese automaker has recorded 28-straight months of increased sales in the United States, leading to the best first-quarter Subaru has ever recorded, and 2014 will almost assuredly be the seventh straight year it has posted improvements. So, what's wrong? The answer is simple, though clearly complicated to resolve. Sedans – specifically, midsize examples – have proven a tough nut for Subaru to crack. The vast majority of those impressive sales statistics have come from just a few models, namely the Forester, Outback and XV Crosstrek. The Impreza continues to sell at a respectable pace, but it's telling that the XV, after just three years on the market, is already Subaru's third-best-selling nameplate, outpacing the aforementioned Impreza (on which it's based), its high-performance WRX sibling and the Legacy, which is now entering its sixth generation, having been first introduced way back in 1989. It's that last model we're examining today. Despite the fact that the Legacy plays in a hotly contested market segment that includes such stalwart sales champions as the Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, Ford Fusion and Nissan Altima, Subaru's competitor registers as a barely visible blip on the radars of new-car buyers. Graphically illustrated another way, Toyota sells 17 Camry sedans for every new Legacy that Subaru moves. Naturally, Subaru is well aware of all this sales data, and it knows how much its bottom line would appreciate another percentage point of the midsize sedan market share. The question that remains unanswered, then, is this: What is the company going to do about it? It's the styling equivalent of, "Nothing to see here, move along." Before we go any further, it's worth mentioning that the last Subaru Legacy was most certainly a credible entry into the midsize sedan market. It boasted plenty of interior roominess, a smattering of engines that either sipped fuel, snorted with turbocharged eagerness or offered a healthy dose of six-cylinder torque, and all, of course, included all-wheel drive. It faltered a bit on the styling front, with cartoonishly large fender flares being the most egregious offense, but had plenty of appeal for performance-minded shoppers... at least until the shift-for-yourself 2.5GT model was dropped in 2013. We'll get back to that in a bit. We're generally pleased with the more refined look of the 2015 Legacy over the awkward duckling of generation five. While its overall look is bland, there are a few interesting styling flourishes to be seen upon closer inspection, including the overt, six-sided front grille and the stylized headlight clusters that bracket it on either side. Bodysides are clean, pulled taught by deep creases in the shoulder and ankle lines. The rear end is pretty basic, with six-cylinder models getting dual exhaust outlets in place of the smaller engine's lonely single exit. Like we said, it's ho-hum and not particularly memorable, but it's inoffensive; the styling equivalent of, "Nothing to see …
Full Review

2015 Legacy Overview

Subaru has a problem on its six-starred hands, but you wouldn't know it at first glance. Sales are up; in fact, the Japanese automaker has recorded 28-straight months of increased sales in the United States, leading to the best first-quarter Subaru has ever recorded, and 2014 will almost assuredly be the seventh straight year it has posted improvements. So, what's wrong? The answer is simple, though clearly complicated to resolve. Sedans – specifically, midsize examples – have proven a tough nut for Subaru to crack. The vast majority of those impressive sales statistics have come from just a few models, namely the Forester, Outback and XV Crosstrek. The Impreza continues to sell at a respectable pace, but it's telling that the XV, after just three years on the market, is already Subaru's third-best-selling nameplate, outpacing the aforementioned Impreza (on which it's based), its high-performance WRX sibling and the Legacy, which is now entering its sixth generation, having been first introduced way back in 1989. It's that last model we're examining today. Despite the fact that the Legacy plays in a hotly contested market segment that includes such stalwart sales champions as the Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, Ford Fusion and Nissan Altima, Subaru's competitor registers as a barely visible blip on the radars of new-car buyers. Graphically illustrated another way, Toyota sells 17 Camry sedans for every new Legacy that Subaru moves. Naturally, Subaru is well aware of all this sales data, and it knows how much its bottom line would appreciate another percentage point of the midsize sedan market share. The question that remains unanswered, then, is this: What is the company going to do about it? It's the styling equivalent of, "Nothing to see here, move along." Before we go any further, it's worth mentioning that the last Subaru Legacy was most certainly a credible entry into the midsize sedan market. It boasted plenty of interior roominess, a smattering of engines that either sipped fuel, snorted with turbocharged eagerness or offered a healthy dose of six-cylinder torque, and all, of course, included all-wheel drive. It faltered a bit on the styling front, with cartoonishly large fender flares being the most egregious offense, but had plenty of appeal for performance-minded shoppers... at least until the shift-for-yourself 2.5GT model was dropped in 2013. We'll get back to that in a bit. We're generally pleased with the more refined look of the 2015 Legacy over the awkward duckling of generation five. While its overall look is bland, there are a few interesting styling flourishes to be seen upon closer inspection, including the overt, six-sided front grille and the stylized headlight clusters that bracket it on either side. Bodysides are clean, pulled taught by deep creases in the shoulder and ankle lines. The rear end is pretty basic, with six-cylinder models getting dual exhaust outlets in place of the smaller engine's lonely single exit. Like we said, it's ho-hum and not particularly memorable, but it's inoffensive; the styling equivalent of, "Nothing to see …Hide Full Review