SRT 392 4dr Rear-wheel Drive Sedan
2015 Dodge Charger

MSRP

$47,995
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N/A
EngineEngine 6.4LV-8
MPGMPG 15 City / 25 Hwy
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2015 Charger Overview

"Scat Pack" is plucked from The Big Book of Dodge Nameplates to describe what is basically the average of the Charger R/T and Charger SRT 392. Unnecessary horsepower always seems to go down better with a dose of heritage. If you think it's a silly name, just be thankful Dodge didn't call it an S/RT or an R/T-S. In previous years, a similar formulation was known as the SRT8 Super Bee. Going by another name, it's still as sweet and wears the same hurried-looking pollinator on the grille. We do wonder: What has displeased him so, and why does he have wings and wheels? The packaging is at least fresh. All Chargers get updates for 2015, including improved interiors and a Dart-on-steroids exterior redo. The new lines work especially well on the more aggressive models, including this Scat Pack car. Like the Super Bee before it, the Scat Pack gets the 6.4-liter engine from SRT 392; for 2015 it gets a slight output boost to 485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque, respective increases of 15 and 5. It does without the SRT three-mode suspension and comes with cloth seats (leather is an option) to keep the price down. The Scat Pack also has slightly smaller Brembo front brakes, narrower wheels, and different rubber. It does, however, cost eight grand less and is just as quick in a straight line. Intriguing. Driving Notes Scat Pack cars get an electronically controlled active exhaust that we'd call hyperactive. It's loud all the time, opening its widest at startup, idle, and when you ask for any appreciable amount of power. Sport mode supposedly makes a difference, but we couldn't discern loud from louder. It's a delicious and appropriate loudness, with a brassy trumpet tone to it, and the engine makes top-fuel noises at full tilt. The squeal of the rear tires can be heard from every stoplight no matter the road conditions. A light touch avoids leaving a mark if you're so inclined. We weren't. When the tires eventually smear into the realm of traction, this thing is pretty quick – hitting 60 miles per hour takes 4.5 seconds. There's also an adjustable launch control mode if you want to cut out some of the wheelspin. The eight-speed transmission shifts smoothly. Quicker, more-palpable shifts are had in Sport mode, but occasionally the transmission still needs a moment to drop down from seventh or eighth when you mash the throttle. Despite its two overdrive gears, this Charger is still loud on the highway. In a good way. Probably. We could see it getting tiresome on a long trip. Following the theme, the ride is on the noisy side, but still comfortable. Nothing masks the car's size. The traction compromise and a liberally programmed stability system let you steer with your right foot; the actual steering is low on feedback but offers a choice of three weight settings. Both the default driving mode and selectable Sport mode are customizable, giving the driver what amounts to …
Full Review

2015 Charger Overview

"Scat Pack" is plucked from The Big Book of Dodge Nameplates to describe what is basically the average of the Charger R/T and Charger SRT 392. Unnecessary horsepower always seems to go down better with a dose of heritage. If you think it's a silly name, just be thankful Dodge didn't call it an S/RT or an R/T-S. In previous years, a similar formulation was known as the SRT8 Super Bee. Going by another name, it's still as sweet and wears the same hurried-looking pollinator on the grille. We do wonder: What has displeased him so, and why does he have wings and wheels? The packaging is at least fresh. All Chargers get updates for 2015, including improved interiors and a Dart-on-steroids exterior redo. The new lines work especially well on the more aggressive models, including this Scat Pack car. Like the Super Bee before it, the Scat Pack gets the 6.4-liter engine from SRT 392; for 2015 it gets a slight output boost to 485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque, respective increases of 15 and 5. It does without the SRT three-mode suspension and comes with cloth seats (leather is an option) to keep the price down. The Scat Pack also has slightly smaller Brembo front brakes, narrower wheels, and different rubber. It does, however, cost eight grand less and is just as quick in a straight line. Intriguing. Driving Notes Scat Pack cars get an electronically controlled active exhaust that we'd call hyperactive. It's loud all the time, opening its widest at startup, idle, and when you ask for any appreciable amount of power. Sport mode supposedly makes a difference, but we couldn't discern loud from louder. It's a delicious and appropriate loudness, with a brassy trumpet tone to it, and the engine makes top-fuel noises at full tilt. The squeal of the rear tires can be heard from every stoplight no matter the road conditions. A light touch avoids leaving a mark if you're so inclined. We weren't. When the tires eventually smear into the realm of traction, this thing is pretty quick – hitting 60 miles per hour takes 4.5 seconds. There's also an adjustable launch control mode if you want to cut out some of the wheelspin. The eight-speed transmission shifts smoothly. Quicker, more-palpable shifts are had in Sport mode, but occasionally the transmission still needs a moment to drop down from seventh or eighth when you mash the throttle. Despite its two overdrive gears, this Charger is still loud on the highway. In a good way. Probably. We could see it getting tiresome on a long trip. Following the theme, the ride is on the noisy side, but still comfortable. Nothing masks the car's size. The traction compromise and a liberally programmed stability system let you steer with your right foot; the actual steering is low on feedback but offers a choice of three weight settings. Both the default driving mode and selectable Sport mode are customizable, giving the driver what amounts to …Hide Full Review