High Roof Cargo Van 136 in. WB
2014 RAM ProMaster 2500

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$31,520
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EngineEngine 3.6LV-6
MPGMPG City / Hwy
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2014 ProMaster 2500 Overview

Front-wheel drive is what sets the all-new Ram ProMaster full-size commercial van apart from its competition. In a segment still choked with thirsty, rear-wheel-drive, ladder frame, pickup truck-based cargo vans, the American automaker is introducing something entirely new – well, new to our domestic market, as Europeans will recognize Ram's fresh entrant as a made-for-USA Fiat Ducato. While the big ProMaster doesn't have a traditional body-on-frame chassis, it isn't a pure unibody either. Consider it a hybrid of both, with a unibody cab up front and a reinforced high-strength steel subframe in the rear. The platform employs double A-arms and MacPherson struts on the front axle, while the rear uses a simple tubular beam axle. Tires are 225/75R16 at all four corners. The steering is hydraulic rack-and-pinion (allowing an impressive 36-foot turning radius) and there are disc brakes with two-piston calipers all around. It is a solid, if unsophisticated, setup. This game-changing van, which has already arrived in showrooms with a starting price of $28,630, is propelled by either a gasoline-powered 3.6-liter Pentastar six-cylinder (280 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque) or a new turbocharged 3.0-liter four-cylinder diesel (174 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque). Ram will offer a traditional six-speed automatic or a new six-speed automated single-clutch manual transmission that drops the hydraulic linkage to improve fuel economy – details are still emerging on this unique gearbox. Positioning the entire powertrain, including the fuel tank, in the nose of the truck means the cargo floor can be very low – Ram boasts it is just 21 inches off the pavement. Operators will be able to stuff 530 cubic feet of cargo into the cavernous ProMaster, with a maximum payload weight of 5,145 pounds (the gross combined weight rating is 11,500 pounds for 3.6-liter and 12,500 pounds for the 3.0-liter). Driving Notes An initial walkaround of this Flame Red test vehicle (a 159-inch wheelbase, high-roof model) reveals a slew of commercial-friendly touches that improve convenience and help lower ownership costs. Easy-to-open sliding doors, both wide enough for pallets, are offered on each side. The cargo floor is available in several finishes (resin-finished wood, painted steel or rubber-coated steel) and there are up to 17 fold-away tie-down rings and an available cargo partition to keep loads secure. At the front of the cargo hold, directly above the cab, is a 'Mom's Attic' for additional storage. The headlights are mounted high on the nose to limit fended-bender damage, and the bumpers are multi-piece so repairing marred sections won't require a complete replacement. It's a thoughtful series of touches that makes for an awkward-looking front end. The driving position is commanding and very truck-like, meaning you sit up straight and lean forward toward the steering wheel. All of the controls are logically located, self-explanatory (manual fan speed, temperature control and distribution) and convenient to reach without stretching. With the seat all the way rearward (I'm six-foot, two-inches tall), the high-mounted shoulder belts fit awkwardly due to the relationship of the B-pillar – …
Full Review

2014 ProMaster 2500 Overview

Front-wheel drive is what sets the all-new Ram ProMaster full-size commercial van apart from its competition. In a segment still choked with thirsty, rear-wheel-drive, ladder frame, pickup truck-based cargo vans, the American automaker is introducing something entirely new – well, new to our domestic market, as Europeans will recognize Ram's fresh entrant as a made-for-USA Fiat Ducato. While the big ProMaster doesn't have a traditional body-on-frame chassis, it isn't a pure unibody either. Consider it a hybrid of both, with a unibody cab up front and a reinforced high-strength steel subframe in the rear. The platform employs double A-arms and MacPherson struts on the front axle, while the rear uses a simple tubular beam axle. Tires are 225/75R16 at all four corners. The steering is hydraulic rack-and-pinion (allowing an impressive 36-foot turning radius) and there are disc brakes with two-piston calipers all around. It is a solid, if unsophisticated, setup. This game-changing van, which has already arrived in showrooms with a starting price of $28,630, is propelled by either a gasoline-powered 3.6-liter Pentastar six-cylinder (280 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque) or a new turbocharged 3.0-liter four-cylinder diesel (174 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque). Ram will offer a traditional six-speed automatic or a new six-speed automated single-clutch manual transmission that drops the hydraulic linkage to improve fuel economy – details are still emerging on this unique gearbox. Positioning the entire powertrain, including the fuel tank, in the nose of the truck means the cargo floor can be very low – Ram boasts it is just 21 inches off the pavement. Operators will be able to stuff 530 cubic feet of cargo into the cavernous ProMaster, with a maximum payload weight of 5,145 pounds (the gross combined weight rating is 11,500 pounds for 3.6-liter and 12,500 pounds for the 3.0-liter). Driving Notes An initial walkaround of this Flame Red test vehicle (a 159-inch wheelbase, high-roof model) reveals a slew of commercial-friendly touches that improve convenience and help lower ownership costs. Easy-to-open sliding doors, both wide enough for pallets, are offered on each side. The cargo floor is available in several finishes (resin-finished wood, painted steel or rubber-coated steel) and there are up to 17 fold-away tie-down rings and an available cargo partition to keep loads secure. At the front of the cargo hold, directly above the cab, is a 'Mom's Attic' for additional storage. The headlights are mounted high on the nose to limit fended-bender damage, and the bumpers are multi-piece so repairing marred sections won't require a complete replacement. It's a thoughtful series of touches that makes for an awkward-looking front end. The driving position is commanding and very truck-like, meaning you sit up straight and lean forward toward the steering wheel. All of the controls are logically located, self-explanatory (manual fan speed, temperature control and distribution) and convenient to reach without stretching. With the seat all the way rearward (I'm six-foot, two-inches tall), the high-mounted shoulder belts fit awkwardly due to the relationship of the B-pillar – …Hide Full Review