Volante 2dr Convertible
2014 Aston Martin Vanquish

2014 Vanquish Photos
Squirrelling Away In Motown With British Royalty As far as unexpected encounters with wild animals go, squirrels don't normally rate. The furry little nut-smugglers are omnipresent fixtures in my neck of the woods – literally – so a chance meeting doesn't warrant caution the way a bear or even an ornery raccoon might. But one's list of priorities can't help but change a bit at 175 miles per hour. That was exactly the case when I drove this Aston Martin's predecessor, the DBS, a few years ago. I was hammering around a closed course – Ford's Romeo proving grounds – on the company's high-banked 5-mile long track, 25 mph shy of the double ton, when a little red dot appeared on the surface of the track, far up the straight. It was a squirrel, which, lacking the good sense not to be on the track at that particular moment, was at least smart enough to flatten itself into a pancake (perhaps it heard the Aston's mighty V12 closing in). I prayed it wouldn't dart from its adjacent lane into mine, because at my closing speed, I figured I wouldn't have time to retaliate. Naturally, the kamikaze rodent skittered on its stomach directly into my trajectory at the last minute, leaving me no choice but to issue a critical hair's breadth correction at the wheel. Roadkill manufacturing is normally a momentary wince-inducing affair – a grimace, a quick appeal for the universe's forgiveness – and then on with one's day. Yet in a car as low as an Aston Martin, at the velocity I was traveling, a bit of fur flying and battered karma would've been the least of my concerns. The squirrel, the DBS and I all survived to fight another day, and that 175-mph run still stands as my own personal v-max. The Aston's high-speed stability and steering saved my bacon that morning, but in truth, I wasn't that impressed with the car overall. So it was with some consternation that I took possession of this 2014 Aston Martin Vanquish, its replacement killer. It's so gorgeous you can't help but take every raindrop that falls on it personally. Like the DBS I drove, this Vanquish rear-wheel-drive coupe arrived riding atop Aston's VH platform, powered by a 5.9-liter V12 paired with the company's Touchtronic six-speed flappy paddle gearbox. It's a direct descendant of the DBS. Hell, it even looks basically the same... all of today's Astons – save the court jester Cygnet – do. And while today's Aston design waters flow obviously and directly from the DB9 of 2004, we've said it before and we'll say it again: that's no bad thing. This Vanquish, now fully sheathed in carbon-fiber bodywork, is about as visually stunning as modern automobiles get. From its general proportions to its exposed carbon elements (everything from the front splitter to the side mirrors and rear fascia is sporting a weave) to its One-77-inspired taillamps, it's so gorgeous that you can't help but take every raindrop that …
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Squirrelling Away In Motown With British Royalty As far as unexpected encounters with wild animals go, squirrels don't normally rate. The furry little nut-smugglers are omnipresent fixtures in my neck of the woods – literally – so a chance meeting doesn't warrant caution the way a bear or even an ornery raccoon might. But one's list of priorities can't help but change a bit at 175 miles per hour. That was exactly the case when I drove this Aston Martin's predecessor, the DBS, a few years ago. I was hammering around a closed course – Ford's Romeo proving grounds – on the company's high-banked 5-mile long track, 25 mph shy of the double ton, when a little red dot appeared on the surface of the track, far up the straight. It was a squirrel, which, lacking the good sense not to be on the track at that particular moment, was at least smart enough to flatten itself into a pancake (perhaps it heard the Aston's mighty V12 closing in). I prayed it wouldn't dart from its adjacent lane into mine, because at my closing speed, I figured I wouldn't have time to retaliate. Naturally, the kamikaze rodent skittered on its stomach directly into my trajectory at the last minute, leaving me no choice but to issue a critical hair's breadth correction at the wheel. Roadkill manufacturing is normally a momentary wince-inducing affair – a grimace, a quick appeal for the universe's forgiveness – and then on with one's day. Yet in a car as low as an Aston Martin, at the velocity I was traveling, a bit of fur flying and battered karma would've been the least of my concerns. The squirrel, the DBS and I all survived to fight another day, and that 175-mph run still stands as my own personal v-max. The Aston's high-speed stability and steering saved my bacon that morning, but in truth, I wasn't that impressed with the car overall. So it was with some consternation that I took possession of this 2014 Aston Martin Vanquish, its replacement killer. It's so gorgeous you can't help but take every raindrop that falls on it personally. Like the DBS I drove, this Vanquish rear-wheel-drive coupe arrived riding atop Aston's VH platform, powered by a 5.9-liter V12 paired with the company's Touchtronic six-speed flappy paddle gearbox. It's a direct descendant of the DBS. Hell, it even looks basically the same... all of today's Astons – save the court jester Cygnet – do. And while today's Aston design waters flow obviously and directly from the DB9 of 2004, we've said it before and we'll say it again: that's no bad thing. This Vanquish, now fully sheathed in carbon-fiber bodywork, is about as visually stunning as modern automobiles get. From its general proportions to its exposed carbon elements (everything from the front splitter to the side mirrors and rear fascia is sporting a weave) to its One-77-inspired taillamps, it's so gorgeous that you can't help but take every raindrop that …
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Retail Price

$296,295 MSRP / Window Sticker Price
Engine 6.0L V-12
MPG 13 City / 19 Hwy
Seating 4 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd w/OD
Power 565 @ 6750 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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