2013 CC Photos

2.0T Lux 4dr Front-wheel Drive Sedan
2013 Volkswagen CC

Has This Four-Door Coupe Lost Its Distinctiveness? When first introduced for the 2009 model year, the CC was breathlessly billed by Volkswagen as a "new offering designed and engineered to blend sports car dynamics and dimensions with sedan comfort in a sophisticated package." The company's first four-door coupe arrived with a dramatically swept roofline, frameless doors, a four-passenger cabin and very distinctive looks. It was arguably the most stylish model in the company's entire lineup. But things have changed for 2013. The automaker has treated its CC to a mid-cycle update that includes a substantial facelift, equipment changes and a new five-passenger cabin for our domestic market. We recently spent a week with the refreshed Volkswagen CC in the Los Angeles basin. Our primary objective was to see how well the midsize four-door would integrate with family duty. We were also intrigued by its "sports car" claims, as its pricing ambitiously aligns it with some seriously talented competition. Lastly, as some are questioning its validity in the lineup compared to the larger all-new Passat, we wanted to understand its value. How well does the refreshed CC fare? Continue reading to find out. As it has been since launch, the 2013 Volkswagen CC is again offered with two engine choices. The smaller of the two is a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder rated at 200 horsepower and 207 pound-feet of torque. It arrives with a traditional six-speed manual gearbox as standard equipment or with a six-speed dual-clutch gearbox (Volkswagen's "DSG") as an option. All four-cylinder models are front-wheel drive. The turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder is rated at 200 horsepower and 207 pound-feet of torque. The larger engine is a naturally aspirated narrow-angle 3.6-liter six-cylinder rated at 280 horsepower and 265 pound-feet of torque. A traditional six-speed Tiptronic automatic is standard, and consumers are offered the choice between front- or the automaker's 4Motion all-wheel drive. All models share a strut-type sport-tuned suspension, with coil springs and telescopic dampers up front and a compact multilink coil-spring design in the rear – both damping and ride height is fixed. The steering rack is electro-mechanical with variable assistance based on vehicle speed, and there are disc brakes at all four corners (with slightly larger rotors on the six-cylinder model). Base models arrive wearing 17-inch wheels, and premium models are fitted with larger 18-inch alloys (wearing 235/40R18 tires) in various designs. The exterior has lost some of its swoopy distinctiveness, but is still unmistakably a VW. As mentioned, the 2013 model is at the receiving end of a mid-cycle update. Most obvious is the model's new front and rear styling. In the nose, bi-xenon projector beams with LED daytime running lamps (on all but the base model) align the CC with the rest of its siblings – and nearly everyone else as the industry jumps on the trend. Complementing the headlights is a new grille and reshaped bumper. The side sills have been slightly resculpted to be more prominent and the rear bumper has been given a bit more …
Full Review
Has This Four-Door Coupe Lost Its Distinctiveness? When first introduced for the 2009 model year, the CC was breathlessly billed by Volkswagen as a "new offering designed and engineered to blend sports car dynamics and dimensions with sedan comfort in a sophisticated package." The company's first four-door coupe arrived with a dramatically swept roofline, frameless doors, a four-passenger cabin and very distinctive looks. It was arguably the most stylish model in the company's entire lineup. But things have changed for 2013. The automaker has treated its CC to a mid-cycle update that includes a substantial facelift, equipment changes and a new five-passenger cabin for our domestic market. We recently spent a week with the refreshed Volkswagen CC in the Los Angeles basin. Our primary objective was to see how well the midsize four-door would integrate with family duty. We were also intrigued by its "sports car" claims, as its pricing ambitiously aligns it with some seriously talented competition. Lastly, as some are questioning its validity in the lineup compared to the larger all-new Passat, we wanted to understand its value. How well does the refreshed CC fare? Continue reading to find out. As it has been since launch, the 2013 Volkswagen CC is again offered with two engine choices. The smaller of the two is a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder rated at 200 horsepower and 207 pound-feet of torque. It arrives with a traditional six-speed manual gearbox as standard equipment or with a six-speed dual-clutch gearbox (Volkswagen's "DSG") as an option. All four-cylinder models are front-wheel drive. The turbocharged 2.0L four-cylinder is rated at 200 horsepower and 207 pound-feet of torque. The larger engine is a naturally aspirated narrow-angle 3.6-liter six-cylinder rated at 280 horsepower and 265 pound-feet of torque. A traditional six-speed Tiptronic automatic is standard, and consumers are offered the choice between front- or the automaker's 4Motion all-wheel drive. All models share a strut-type sport-tuned suspension, with coil springs and telescopic dampers up front and a compact multilink coil-spring design in the rear – both damping and ride height is fixed. The steering rack is electro-mechanical with variable assistance based on vehicle speed, and there are disc brakes at all four corners (with slightly larger rotors on the six-cylinder model). Base models arrive wearing 17-inch wheels, and premium models are fitted with larger 18-inch alloys (wearing 235/40R18 tires) in various designs. The exterior has lost some of its swoopy distinctiveness, but is still unmistakably a VW. As mentioned, the 2013 model is at the receiving end of a mid-cycle update. Most obvious is the model's new front and rear styling. In the nose, bi-xenon projector beams with LED daytime running lamps (on all but the base model) align the CC with the rest of its siblings – and nearly everyone else as the industry jumps on the trend. Complementing the headlights is a new grille and reshaped bumper. The side sills have been slightly resculpted to be more prominent and the rear bumper has been given a bit more …
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Retail Price

$35,635 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

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Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG 22 City / 31 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd auto-shift man w/OD
Power 200 @ 5100 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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