1LT 4dr Hatchback
2012 Chevrolet Sonic

MSRP

$15,865
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
 Engine 1.8LI-4
 MPG 26 City / 35 Hwy
 More View All Specs

2012 Sonic Overview

An Aveo By Any Other Name Is, Indeed, Sweet Whether General Motors likes it or not, the Sonic story starts in 2004, when GM decided to import a cheap, crummy little econobox from Korea. A product of its newest subsidiary, Daewoo, the Chevrolet Aveo had few charms. But it was available as a five-door hatchback, one of the few on the market at the time, and its starting sticker price was under $10,000. It was enough of a pitch that the car sold – and stuck around. Some of us actually developed a modicum of affection for the little piece of junk. It's not every new car that you can use and abuse and care not a whit about. If GM had marketed the Aveo as a disposable product, meant to be driven hard and left for dead, it might have disappointed fewer people. Instead, the Aveo was famously named the "Least Satisfying" vehicle of 2007 in a Consumer Reports survey. Hundreds of thousands of Aveos have been dumped here over the years, often into rental car fleets where they would have even greater opportunity to reflect poorly on GM. The company sold some 48,000 Aveos in 2010, over 28,000 in 2011, and stragglers on dealer lots continue to find new homes even as you read this. So it's no wonder the "new" GM doesn't want us talking about the Sonic as its replacement. But that it is. And thankfully, it's a good one. We'd even be willing to call it great if GM would work on a few of the details. Our test vehicle was an $18,690, five-door LTZ. This is the top-of-the-line Sonic, which is why its MSRP was so much more expensive than the $14,635 (plus $760 destination) starting price Chevy is advertising. While nearly $20,000 for a subcompact that in a previous life was the cheapest car sold in America seems high, the Sonic hatchback looks and feels like a quality product from the start. Its design is aggressive, leaning purposefully forward thanks to two character lines running from the front wheel well towards the rear of the car. The Sonic has the best looking front fascia we've seen on a Chevy in years, with oversize fog lamps complimenting the projector-style headlights, which are wrapped in a black bezel to make them appear even more recessed. They will no doubt prove hard to keep clean, but fashion exacts a price. So too does the clever rear door handle, hidden in the black C-pillar, Chevy Beretta-style. While it does an excellent job of making the Sonic seem like a sportier three-door, little kids will find it hard to reach. But Chevy isn't building the Sonic just for economically strapped families anymore. This is a car meant to be taken seriously by people who enjoy driving. So slipping behind the wheel you're presented with an instrument panel that looks like it was plucked straight from a sport bike. (That's a motorcycle, mom, not a Schwinn.) A large, hooded …
Full Review

2012 Sonic Overview

An Aveo By Any Other Name Is, Indeed, Sweet Whether General Motors likes it or not, the Sonic story starts in 2004, when GM decided to import a cheap, crummy little econobox from Korea. A product of its newest subsidiary, Daewoo, the Chevrolet Aveo had few charms. But it was available as a five-door hatchback, one of the few on the market at the time, and its starting sticker price was under $10,000. It was enough of a pitch that the car sold – and stuck around. Some of us actually developed a modicum of affection for the little piece of junk. It's not every new car that you can use and abuse and care not a whit about. If GM had marketed the Aveo as a disposable product, meant to be driven hard and left for dead, it might have disappointed fewer people. Instead, the Aveo was famously named the "Least Satisfying" vehicle of 2007 in a Consumer Reports survey. Hundreds of thousands of Aveos have been dumped here over the years, often into rental car fleets where they would have even greater opportunity to reflect poorly on GM. The company sold some 48,000 Aveos in 2010, over 28,000 in 2011, and stragglers on dealer lots continue to find new homes even as you read this. So it's no wonder the "new" GM doesn't want us talking about the Sonic as its replacement. But that it is. And thankfully, it's a good one. We'd even be willing to call it great if GM would work on a few of the details. Our test vehicle was an $18,690, five-door LTZ. This is the top-of-the-line Sonic, which is why its MSRP was so much more expensive than the $14,635 (plus $760 destination) starting price Chevy is advertising. While nearly $20,000 for a subcompact that in a previous life was the cheapest car sold in America seems high, the Sonic hatchback looks and feels like a quality product from the start. Its design is aggressive, leaning purposefully forward thanks to two character lines running from the front wheel well towards the rear of the car. The Sonic has the best looking front fascia we've seen on a Chevy in years, with oversize fog lamps complimenting the projector-style headlights, which are wrapped in a black bezel to make them appear even more recessed. They will no doubt prove hard to keep clean, but fashion exacts a price. So too does the clever rear door handle, hidden in the black C-pillar, Chevy Beretta-style. While it does an excellent job of making the Sonic seem like a sportier three-door, little kids will find it hard to reach. But Chevy isn't building the Sonic just for economically strapped families anymore. This is a car meant to be taken seriously by people who enjoy driving. So slipping behind the wheel you're presented with an instrument panel that looks like it was plucked straight from a sport bike. (That's a motorcycle, mom, not a Schwinn.) A large, hooded …Hide Full Review