2012 Bentley Continental GTC

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$212,800 - $212,800
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EngineEngine 6.0LW-12
MPGMPG 11 City / 19 Hwy
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2012 Continental GTC Overview

The Fast and the Fabulous: Menace on the Mediterranean We want a Bentley to feel both weighted down with that famous wafting substance and yet always ready to spool up fast and hard like an express train when there's an opportunity to overtake the poor. One could see that as a dilemma for the automaker, as the world jumps on the "lightweight and green" bandwagon. But this, in reality, is a form of special dispensation we allow both Bentley and Rolls-Royce year after year. If Bentleys started feeling light or harried, we'd be less impressed. We could see closing the roof of the new Bentley Continental GTC when we might, say, want to explore high-speed runs, but even then it would feel improper; the GTC looks so damned good and inviting with that big roof down, it'd be a crime to enjoy it otherwise. We've recorded the roof action for you on video here, but only because it's sort of required that we have you bear witness to the triple-layered folding lid. We didn't close the roof once during our two days testing as the GTC is one of the purest forms of life on the sunny side of the street. We've driven the second-generation Continental GT with the massaged 6.0-liter W12 bi-turbo, now pumping out 567 horsepower peaking at 6,000 rpm, and cranking forth 516 pound-feet of torque between 1,700 and 6,000 rpm. That 5,115-pound bear of a GT roars to 60 mph in a reported 4.4 seconds. The soft-top version we're driving now weighs 5,500 pounds, gets to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds and is limited to "just" 195 mph. Yes, 385 pounds have been added to its curb weight, all in the name of making sure this wide-open scoundrel of substance doesn't bend like a noodle versus the hardtop. Ever try to juke with 385 pounds attached to your lower extremities? It's a lot, but the Continental is a lot of car. The new-gen GT can sometimes feel over-tired with the 21-inch wheels and Pirelli P Zeros that Bentley has always prefered, making the ride a little sturdier than we sometimes wish. Combined with the four-setting Intelligent Continuous Damping Control suspension adjustable through the 8.0-inch touchscreen display, the optional 21-inchers at the corners can take on some harsher feedback as felt through the seats and hands. Bentley introduced a much welcome 20-inch standard set soon after the launch of the coupe and it makes a noticeable difference. The funny (more curious than ha-ha) added consequence, however, of the additional heft built into the forward bulkhead, windscreen pillars and rocker panels of the GTC is that it drives brilliantly on the 21-inch setup. In fact, so far as sheer Newton meters/degree flex numbers, the GTC is the most rigid convertible in production today, which in turn frees up the suspension to be toyed with a bit to find the comfort desired. There are some eerily perfect new roads in the middle of nowhere across Istria, Croatia where Bentley …
Full Review

2012 Continental GTC Overview

The Fast and the Fabulous: Menace on the Mediterranean We want a Bentley to feel both weighted down with that famous wafting substance and yet always ready to spool up fast and hard like an express train when there's an opportunity to overtake the poor. One could see that as a dilemma for the automaker, as the world jumps on the "lightweight and green" bandwagon. But this, in reality, is a form of special dispensation we allow both Bentley and Rolls-Royce year after year. If Bentleys started feeling light or harried, we'd be less impressed. We could see closing the roof of the new Bentley Continental GTC when we might, say, want to explore high-speed runs, but even then it would feel improper; the GTC looks so damned good and inviting with that big roof down, it'd be a crime to enjoy it otherwise. We've recorded the roof action for you on video here, but only because it's sort of required that we have you bear witness to the triple-layered folding lid. We didn't close the roof once during our two days testing as the GTC is one of the purest forms of life on the sunny side of the street. We've driven the second-generation Continental GT with the massaged 6.0-liter W12 bi-turbo, now pumping out 567 horsepower peaking at 6,000 rpm, and cranking forth 516 pound-feet of torque between 1,700 and 6,000 rpm. That 5,115-pound bear of a GT roars to 60 mph in a reported 4.4 seconds. The soft-top version we're driving now weighs 5,500 pounds, gets to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds and is limited to "just" 195 mph. Yes, 385 pounds have been added to its curb weight, all in the name of making sure this wide-open scoundrel of substance doesn't bend like a noodle versus the hardtop. Ever try to juke with 385 pounds attached to your lower extremities? It's a lot, but the Continental is a lot of car. The new-gen GT can sometimes feel over-tired with the 21-inch wheels and Pirelli P Zeros that Bentley has always prefered, making the ride a little sturdier than we sometimes wish. Combined with the four-setting Intelligent Continuous Damping Control suspension adjustable through the 8.0-inch touchscreen display, the optional 21-inchers at the corners can take on some harsher feedback as felt through the seats and hands. Bentley introduced a much welcome 20-inch standard set soon after the launch of the coupe and it makes a noticeable difference. The funny (more curious than ha-ha) added consequence, however, of the additional heft built into the forward bulkhead, windscreen pillars and rocker panels of the GTC is that it drives brilliantly on the 21-inch setup. In fact, so far as sheer Newton meters/degree flex numbers, the GTC is the most rigid convertible in production today, which in turn frees up the suspension to be toyed with a bit to find the comfort desired. There are some eerily perfect new roads in the middle of nowhere across Istria, Croatia where Bentley …Hide Full Review