Carrera 4S 2dr All-wheel Drive Cabriolet
2011 Porsche 911

2011 911 Photos

MSRP

$107,800
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 Engine 3.8LH-6
 MPG 17 City / 25 Hwy
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2011 911 Overview

A Flywheel-Equipped Race Car Leaves Us Whirring for More Spinning at 36,000 revolutions per minute just two feet from my right thigh, a 31-pound flywheel is screaming like a five-horsepower Shop-Vac with the filter removed. The sound pierces the composite shell of my racing helmet and drills through my form-fitted foam earplugs before painfully slamming into my eardrums. Yet despite the aching annoyance, I welcome and embrace the high-pitched drone. It means, in the simplest terms, that the monster inside this ballistic carbon fiber cocoon is not only awake, but completely energized. With a stab of the throttle, the kinetic energy in the spinning flywheel is automatically exchanged for electricity – the charged ions power two strong electric motors on the front axle. Instantaneously bestowed with 200 torque-laden horsepower, the sticky Michelin slicks claw at the pavement with a vengeance. I clench the wheel as the carbon-fiber bodied race car lunges forward with more accelerative force than an F-16 fighter jet at takeoff power. Welcome to the driver's seat of the Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0. Peer high up on Porsche's performance ladder, above the two-dozen or so street legal 911 models – above even the GT2 – to find the automaker's most competitive cars. Vehicles bred purposely for the track. The Porsche 997 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is one such model. Compared to its predecessor, which debuted last year, the second-generation hybrid is 20 percent lighter and more efficient without any concession to lap times. While sharing the same paint scheme, the new vehicle is easily identified by its lack of intakes in front of each rear wheel – changes to engine cooling allowed the slats to be dropped and aerodynamic efficiency improved. Beneath the orange, white, silver and black wrap, the GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 features a monocoque body of hot-galvanized steel with a welded roll cage. Body panels are carbon fiber and there are lightweight polycarbonate windows on all sides, including the front windshield. At each corner is a height-adjustable suspension with dual coil springs and Sachs gas-pressure fixed-position dampers. The steering rack is power-assisted, with an electro-hydraulic pressure feed, and there is a car-mounted air-jack system for use in the pits. With help from Bosch MS 4.0 engine management and a race exhaust system, the gas engine is tuned to develop 470 horsepower. At the front are six-piston monobloc aluminum calipers over 15-inch ventilated iron rotors. The rear features four-piston monobloc aluminum calipers over 14-inch ventilated iron rotors and there are optimized brake ducts aimed at all four to ensure sufficient cooling. Compared to the standard GT3 Cup (which we drove earlier this year), the wheel/tire package on the GT3 R Hybrid is wider to accommodate the extra workload of the tires. The front and rear wheels are one-piece BBS forged aluminum alloy (11.5x18 and 13x18, respectively) with a single central-locking nut, while dry compound Michelin Porsche Cup N1 slicks tires come standard (30/65-18 front and 31/71-18 rear). Hung behind the rear wheels of the …
Full Review

2011 911 Overview

A Flywheel-Equipped Race Car Leaves Us Whirring for More Spinning at 36,000 revolutions per minute just two feet from my right thigh, a 31-pound flywheel is screaming like a five-horsepower Shop-Vac with the filter removed. The sound pierces the composite shell of my racing helmet and drills through my form-fitted foam earplugs before painfully slamming into my eardrums. Yet despite the aching annoyance, I welcome and embrace the high-pitched drone. It means, in the simplest terms, that the monster inside this ballistic carbon fiber cocoon is not only awake, but completely energized. With a stab of the throttle, the kinetic energy in the spinning flywheel is automatically exchanged for electricity – the charged ions power two strong electric motors on the front axle. Instantaneously bestowed with 200 torque-laden horsepower, the sticky Michelin slicks claw at the pavement with a vengeance. I clench the wheel as the carbon-fiber bodied race car lunges forward with more accelerative force than an F-16 fighter jet at takeoff power. Welcome to the driver's seat of the Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0. Peer high up on Porsche's performance ladder, above the two-dozen or so street legal 911 models – above even the GT2 – to find the automaker's most competitive cars. Vehicles bred purposely for the track. The Porsche 997 GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 is one such model. Compared to its predecessor, which debuted last year, the second-generation hybrid is 20 percent lighter and more efficient without any concession to lap times. While sharing the same paint scheme, the new vehicle is easily identified by its lack of intakes in front of each rear wheel – changes to engine cooling allowed the slats to be dropped and aerodynamic efficiency improved. Beneath the orange, white, silver and black wrap, the GT3 R Hybrid 2.0 features a monocoque body of hot-galvanized steel with a welded roll cage. Body panels are carbon fiber and there are lightweight polycarbonate windows on all sides, including the front windshield. At each corner is a height-adjustable suspension with dual coil springs and Sachs gas-pressure fixed-position dampers. The steering rack is power-assisted, with an electro-hydraulic pressure feed, and there is a car-mounted air-jack system for use in the pits. With help from Bosch MS 4.0 engine management and a race exhaust system, the gas engine is tuned to develop 470 horsepower. At the front are six-piston monobloc aluminum calipers over 15-inch ventilated iron rotors. The rear features four-piston monobloc aluminum calipers over 14-inch ventilated iron rotors and there are optimized brake ducts aimed at all four to ensure sufficient cooling. Compared to the standard GT3 Cup (which we drove earlier this year), the wheel/tire package on the GT3 R Hybrid is wider to accommodate the extra workload of the tires. The front and rear wheels are one-piece BBS forged aluminum alloy (11.5x18 and 13x18, respectively) with a single central-locking nut, while dry compound Michelin Porsche Cup N1 slicks tires come standard (30/65-18 front and 31/71-18 rear). Hung behind the rear wheels of the …Hide Full Review