2.0T Premium 2dr All-wheel Drive quattro Roadster
2011 Audi TT

2011 TT Photos
Least Costly TT Gives Entry-Level A Very Positive Meaning 2011 Audi TT 2.0 Quattro Coupe - Click above for high-res image gallery Audi invited us out to a California track a little more than a year ago for some hot laps in its new TT RS. Fresh out of development, the enthusiast-tuned variant of its ever-stylish coupe was fitted with a turbocharged 2.5-liter five-cylinder sending 340 horsepower to every corner through Audi's Quattro all-wheel-drive system. Quick, nimble and offered only with a six-speed manual, the gussied-up two-seater was not only the ultimate expression of the chassis' capabilities, it was a gift to those with a passion for driving. Last September, after a successful Facebook petition, Audi decided to bring the TT RS to the States. As word of the announcement spread, we're guessing that more than a few Porsche Boxster and Mercedes-Benz SLK owners felt chills go up their spines. Fourteen months after blasting around Willow Springs Raceway in the talented TT RS, we found a TT 2.0T Quattro sitting in our driveway. For those unfamiliar with Audi's lineup, the 2.0T is relegated to the bottom of the pole as the least expensive and least powerful model in the franchise. So... just how would we swallow the entry-level coupe with the taste of the wondrous TT RS still fresh in our mouths? As it happened, we were pleasantly surprised. Audi has been doing some consolidating recently. Just a couple years ago, its TT was offered in two bodystyles (coupe and convertible) with two engines (2.0-liter inline-four and a 3.2-liter V6) two drivelines (front- or all-wheel drive) and two transmissions (six-speed manual or dual-clutch). Today's Audi TT is still available in both fixed and drophead forms, but all (with the exception of the yet-to-be-introduced TT RS) share variants of the same four-cylinder engine, dual-clutch gearbox and Quattro all-wheel drive powertrain. Along with the simplifications came improvement. With the platform was entering its fifth year (it was introduced in 2007), Audi took the opportunity to freshen the 2011 TT lineup with a new front bumper design, reworked grille accents, a dab of chrome trim and standard LED daytime running lamps. New colors were introduced, new options appeared on the order sheet and most importantly, a new engine greatly improved fuel economy and power. In this case, our test car wears a verbose name: The 2011 Audi TT 2.0 TFSI Quattro S-Tronic Coupe. Its base price is pegged at $38,300, but the Oolong Gray metallic paint adds $475 (the black leather is no charge) and there are a few other upgrades. These include navigation with Audi Music Interface ($2,070), Audi Magnetic Ride with sport button ($1,900) and heated front seats ($475). Destination ($875) brings the bottom line to a very reasonable $44,070 - the TTS starts at $47,875, while the TT RS will likely run nearly $60,000 when U.S. pricing is finally announced. For comparison's sake, a standard Porsche Cayman starts at $51,900 while the all-new Mercedes-Benz SLK starts at $54,800 – both …
Full Review
Least Costly TT Gives Entry-Level A Very Positive Meaning 2011 Audi TT 2.0 Quattro Coupe - Click above for high-res image gallery Audi invited us out to a California track a little more than a year ago for some hot laps in its new TT RS. Fresh out of development, the enthusiast-tuned variant of its ever-stylish coupe was fitted with a turbocharged 2.5-liter five-cylinder sending 340 horsepower to every corner through Audi's Quattro all-wheel-drive system. Quick, nimble and offered only with a six-speed manual, the gussied-up two-seater was not only the ultimate expression of the chassis' capabilities, it was a gift to those with a passion for driving. Last September, after a successful Facebook petition, Audi decided to bring the TT RS to the States. As word of the announcement spread, we're guessing that more than a few Porsche Boxster and Mercedes-Benz SLK owners felt chills go up their spines. Fourteen months after blasting around Willow Springs Raceway in the talented TT RS, we found a TT 2.0T Quattro sitting in our driveway. For those unfamiliar with Audi's lineup, the 2.0T is relegated to the bottom of the pole as the least expensive and least powerful model in the franchise. So... just how would we swallow the entry-level coupe with the taste of the wondrous TT RS still fresh in our mouths? As it happened, we were pleasantly surprised. Audi has been doing some consolidating recently. Just a couple years ago, its TT was offered in two bodystyles (coupe and convertible) with two engines (2.0-liter inline-four and a 3.2-liter V6) two drivelines (front- or all-wheel drive) and two transmissions (six-speed manual or dual-clutch). Today's Audi TT is still available in both fixed and drophead forms, but all (with the exception of the yet-to-be-introduced TT RS) share variants of the same four-cylinder engine, dual-clutch gearbox and Quattro all-wheel drive powertrain. Along with the simplifications came improvement. With the platform was entering its fifth year (it was introduced in 2007), Audi took the opportunity to freshen the 2011 TT lineup with a new front bumper design, reworked grille accents, a dab of chrome trim and standard LED daytime running lamps. New colors were introduced, new options appeared on the order sheet and most importantly, a new engine greatly improved fuel economy and power. In this case, our test car wears a verbose name: The 2011 Audi TT 2.0 TFSI Quattro S-Tronic Coupe. Its base price is pegged at $38,300, but the Oolong Gray metallic paint adds $475 (the black leather is no charge) and there are a few other upgrades. These include navigation with Audi Music Interface ($2,070), Audi Magnetic Ride with sport button ($1,900) and heated front seats ($475). Destination ($875) brings the bottom line to a very reasonable $44,070 - the TTS starts at $47,875, while the TT RS will likely run nearly $60,000 when U.S. pricing is finally announced. For comparison's sake, a standard Porsche Cayman starts at $51,900 while the all-new Mercedes-Benz SLK starts at $54,800 – both …
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Retail Price

$41,300 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG 22 City / 31 Hwy
Seating 2 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd auto-shift man w/OD
Power 211 @ 4300 rpm
Drivetrain quattro all wheel
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