Base 4dr All-wheel Drive
2010 Lexus RX 450h

MSRP ?

$44,275
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EngineEngine V-6
MPGMPG 30 City / 28 Hwy
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2010 RX 450h Overview

2010 Lexus RX 450h - Click above for high-res image gallery With a slew of sensors and CPUs, the 2010 Lexus RX450h can pretty much drive itself. Want to go somewhere? Sit down in the driver's seat, use the Remote Touch device (a.k.a. "mouse") to tell the crossover where you want to go, and follow the easy-as-store-bought-pie instructions to your destination. Whether or not this is a good thing depends on how badly you want to feel like you're in control of your commute. For those concerned about fuel economy and comfort, the almost-autonomous nature of the RX450h is nice, but certainly doesn't offer a tremendous amount of ability to control how much fuel you burn moving down the street. As it turns out, this is a feature, not a bug. Find out why after the jump. %Gallery-81465% Photos by Sebastian Blanco / Copyright ©2009 Weblogs, Inc. How does the RX450h make it absurdly easy to get from one point to another? Through a combination of shiny luxuries and thoughtful technologies that give the operator fewer things to concentrate on while driving. Front and center among these new technologies is the car's heads-up display (HUD), which integrates directions from the navigation system in an amazingly intuitive way. Of course, to see those HUD arrows, you need to have the navigation system, which adds at least $2,550 to the RX450h's $41,660 base price. Whether or not you opt to spend the extra money, the HUD exemplifies how Lexus has made the RX450h a simple and comfortable hybrid. Aside from directions, it displays your speed, along with the ability to adjust the brightness and angle to provide exactly the right look no matter the conditions (it can also be turned off). During long drives, when it comes time to lean forward on the steering wheel to straighten up the back for a few moments, you can still see how fast you're going, something we truly appreciated after a few hours on the highway. Of course, if you're letting the RX450h control its own speed with its adaptive cruise control, knowing your mph doesn't matter as much, but still, it's a nice touch. We drove just over 550 miles during our week with this all-wheel drive 2010 Lexus 450h. For the first 250 or so miles, we let the machine do its thing in Eco mode: the adaptive cruise control was on and set to just a hair over the speed limit, climate control was set to auto and we followed the navigation system where it told us to go. The distance that the adaptive cruise control sets between the RX450h and the vehicle in front of it is, of course, adjustable. Nonetheless, it's not suitable for drafting – which we don't endorse anyway – and on the closest setting, it still kept us a safe distance away from other vehicles, even when people shifted lanes directly in front of us. On auto-pilot (or as close as it gets these days), the …
Full Review

2010 RX 450h Overview

2010 Lexus RX 450h - Click above for high-res image gallery With a slew of sensors and CPUs, the 2010 Lexus RX450h can pretty much drive itself. Want to go somewhere? Sit down in the driver's seat, use the Remote Touch device (a.k.a. "mouse") to tell the crossover where you want to go, and follow the easy-as-store-bought-pie instructions to your destination. Whether or not this is a good thing depends on how badly you want to feel like you're in control of your commute. For those concerned about fuel economy and comfort, the almost-autonomous nature of the RX450h is nice, but certainly doesn't offer a tremendous amount of ability to control how much fuel you burn moving down the street. As it turns out, this is a feature, not a bug. Find out why after the jump. %Gallery-81465% Photos by Sebastian Blanco / Copyright ©2009 Weblogs, Inc. How does the RX450h make it absurdly easy to get from one point to another? Through a combination of shiny luxuries and thoughtful technologies that give the operator fewer things to concentrate on while driving. Front and center among these new technologies is the car's heads-up display (HUD), which integrates directions from the navigation system in an amazingly intuitive way. Of course, to see those HUD arrows, you need to have the navigation system, which adds at least $2,550 to the RX450h's $41,660 base price. Whether or not you opt to spend the extra money, the HUD exemplifies how Lexus has made the RX450h a simple and comfortable hybrid. Aside from directions, it displays your speed, along with the ability to adjust the brightness and angle to provide exactly the right look no matter the conditions (it can also be turned off). During long drives, when it comes time to lean forward on the steering wheel to straighten up the back for a few moments, you can still see how fast you're going, something we truly appreciated after a few hours on the highway. Of course, if you're letting the RX450h control its own speed with its adaptive cruise control, knowing your mph doesn't matter as much, but still, it's a nice touch. We drove just over 550 miles during our week with this all-wheel drive 2010 Lexus 450h. For the first 250 or so miles, we let the machine do its thing in Eco mode: the adaptive cruise control was on and set to just a hair over the speed limit, climate control was set to auto and we followed the navigation system where it told us to go. The distance that the adaptive cruise control sets between the RX450h and the vehicle in front of it is, of course, adjustable. Nonetheless, it's not suitable for drafting – which we don't endorse anyway – and on the closest setting, it still kept us a safe distance away from other vehicles, even when people shifted lanes directly in front of us. On auto-pilot (or as close as it gets these days), the …Hide Full Review