2010 Ford Shelby GT500

MSRP

$46,725 - $51,725
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EngineEngine 5.4LV-8
MPGMPG 14 City / 22 Hwy
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2010 Shelby GT500 Overview

2010 Ford Shelby GT500 - Click above for a high-res image gallery We know what you're thinking. Isn't it a little late to be reviewing the 2010 Shelby GT500? After all, Ford introduced the 2011 version with the new aluminum block at last month's Chicago Auto Show. It's not that we didn't want to get our hands on the 2010 GT500 before now. In fact, we were champing at the bit to review one a few days after our First Drive, but apparently the universe didn't want us to have one until now. Last summer, a few issues delayed our chance at driving Ford's hottest 'Stang, beginning with Ford running out of tires for the GT500s in the press fleet (we can't imagine why). When Fall rolled around, the transmission in our tester was damaged the week before we were scheduled to take delivery. We were ready to give up hope when the call came in that it would be available in March. Better late than never, right? Besides, who's going to turn down a week with a 540-horsepower muscle car? Al Gore? Definitely not us. To be honest, our expectations couldn't have been higher. Our last encounter with the 2010 GT500 at Infineon Raceway allowed us to let loose on the 1/4-mile drag strip and smooth pavement of the road course, the perfect playgrounds for a high-horsepower Mustang laden with its infamous solid rear axle. It was essentially on par with the $80,000 GT500KR, but cost $30,000 less and came without Shelby's controversial carbon fiber hood, which we could do without anyway. After a day's worth of fruitful flogging, we were ready to sign the check. But would the GT500 be a less likable character off-track? Could a 540-horsepower Mustang suit our daily requirements of equal parts grocery-getting and canyon-carving? Read on to find out. %Gallery-88609% Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Visually, the GT500 benefits from the 2010 redesign more so than the standard Mustang V6 and GT models. The rear end, especially the taillights, doesn't look quite as awkward thanks to the subtle spoiler, and the front end takes on a slightly more aggressive appearance with its protruding snout. We're also particularly fond of the new 19-inch wheels, which appear more upscale compared to the previous 18-inch rollers. The plastic front spoiler and rear diffuser come across as bargain-basement pieces, but that might not be such a bad thing. We didn't have any problems making it over some steep dips in the road, but the car arrived with a slightly damaged lip, likely the result of a tall curb in a parking lot. It didn't take long for us to realize that parking the GT500 is more challenging that it would appear, as it's nearly impossible to judge exactly where the massive front end is when pulling forward. If that part of the coupe is going to take some fairly frequent abuse, then we would rather have the parts be as inexpensive as …
Full Review

2010 Shelby GT500 Overview

2010 Ford Shelby GT500 - Click above for a high-res image gallery We know what you're thinking. Isn't it a little late to be reviewing the 2010 Shelby GT500? After all, Ford introduced the 2011 version with the new aluminum block at last month's Chicago Auto Show. It's not that we didn't want to get our hands on the 2010 GT500 before now. In fact, we were champing at the bit to review one a few days after our First Drive, but apparently the universe didn't want us to have one until now. Last summer, a few issues delayed our chance at driving Ford's hottest 'Stang, beginning with Ford running out of tires for the GT500s in the press fleet (we can't imagine why). When Fall rolled around, the transmission in our tester was damaged the week before we were scheduled to take delivery. We were ready to give up hope when the call came in that it would be available in March. Better late than never, right? Besides, who's going to turn down a week with a 540-horsepower muscle car? Al Gore? Definitely not us. To be honest, our expectations couldn't have been higher. Our last encounter with the 2010 GT500 at Infineon Raceway allowed us to let loose on the 1/4-mile drag strip and smooth pavement of the road course, the perfect playgrounds for a high-horsepower Mustang laden with its infamous solid rear axle. It was essentially on par with the $80,000 GT500KR, but cost $30,000 less and came without Shelby's controversial carbon fiber hood, which we could do without anyway. After a day's worth of fruitful flogging, we were ready to sign the check. But would the GT500 be a less likable character off-track? Could a 540-horsepower Mustang suit our daily requirements of equal parts grocery-getting and canyon-carving? Read on to find out. %Gallery-88609% Photos by Drew Phillips / Copyright ©2010 Weblogs, Inc. Visually, the GT500 benefits from the 2010 redesign more so than the standard Mustang V6 and GT models. The rear end, especially the taillights, doesn't look quite as awkward thanks to the subtle spoiler, and the front end takes on a slightly more aggressive appearance with its protruding snout. We're also particularly fond of the new 19-inch wheels, which appear more upscale compared to the previous 18-inch rollers. The plastic front spoiler and rear diffuser come across as bargain-basement pieces, but that might not be such a bad thing. We didn't have any problems making it over some steep dips in the road, but the car arrived with a slightly damaged lip, likely the result of a tall curb in a parking lot. It didn't take long for us to realize that parking the GT500 is more challenging that it would appear, as it's nearly impossible to judge exactly where the massive front end is when pulling forward. If that part of the coupe is going to take some fairly frequent abuse, then we would rather have the parts be as inexpensive as …Hide Full Review