Base 4dr Rear-wheel Drive Sedan
2009 INFINITI M35

MSRP ?

$45,800
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N/A
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EngineEngine 3.5LV-6
MPGMPG 16 City / 23 Hwy
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2009 M35 Overview

2009 Infiniti M35 – Click above for high-res image gallery The traditional definition of a Q-ship is a vessel that appears harmless, yet harbors deadly weaponry. Infiniti's M-series fits that description rather well. Around since 2006, the M35 isn't new to the scene, but for 2009, the M has emerged from dry-dock with a series of upgrades to help lure buyers away from its Germanic competition. Previous battles have proven that The New doesn't always emerge victorious when undertaking sneak attacks, and the M35 ambushed us straightaway. %Gallery-46032% Photos Copyright ©2009 Dan Roth / Weblogs, Inc. It's possible to criticize the M35 as an anonycar, but its lack of flash allows it to slip past unnoticed as easily as its .28 Cd slices through the air. The car looks good, even without origami flame surfacing or chromed-up fender vents. There's just enough brightwork outside, and Infiniti has done an admirable job of giving all its sedans a familial resemblance. Indeed, a quick glance might register a distinct G-note to the uninformed onlooker, but the M is less swoopy, more square and, of course, bigger. Knee-jerk shoppers might default to a Lexus or something from Deutschland, but the M35 is a well turned-out package that usually garners the response "oh yeah" when mentioned. It's competitive in its class, though the quiet styling may be off-putting to buyers looking for more presence. If understatement is appealing, the M35 has the potential to be a temptress to true car people. The 3.5-liter V6 is fitted further towards the firewall and the driven wheels are in the proper place. The details are attended to both inside and out, making the M35 feel fussed over, like a quality piece of machinery. Evidence of this is found in the scalloped rim around the gauges and the super tight body panel gaps -- the kind of minutiae that analytical personalities get excited about. Nissan's widely-praised VQ35HR V6 delivers more wallop than the spec sheet suggests, with the revised mill feeling significantly stronger than its claimed 303 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. The seven-speed automatic gearbox offers a wide spread of ratios and a loafing, relaxed highway cruise. Around town and on the open road, the transmission is wonderfully responsive and quick about its business without snapping your head back, and when the mood strikes you, there's a manual mode that can be controlled through a set of steering wheel-mounted paddles. Downshifts bring rev matches, so you can feel like a hero even if you don't know how to heel-toe, and a Drive Sport shift mode brings the aggression when you're ready to forget about wafting and get down to business. The leather-wrapped, button-laden steering wheel is connected to a rack that can feel overly light and slightly numb one moment, and near perfect the next. The helm's wonkiness is disappointing in a vehicle that works incredibly well otherwise. There's tramlining as the wheels follow ruts and it's sometimes difficult to put the M35 on a …
Full Review

2009 M35 Overview

2009 Infiniti M35 – Click above for high-res image gallery The traditional definition of a Q-ship is a vessel that appears harmless, yet harbors deadly weaponry. Infiniti's M-series fits that description rather well. Around since 2006, the M35 isn't new to the scene, but for 2009, the M has emerged from dry-dock with a series of upgrades to help lure buyers away from its Germanic competition. Previous battles have proven that The New doesn't always emerge victorious when undertaking sneak attacks, and the M35 ambushed us straightaway. %Gallery-46032% Photos Copyright ©2009 Dan Roth / Weblogs, Inc. It's possible to criticize the M35 as an anonycar, but its lack of flash allows it to slip past unnoticed as easily as its .28 Cd slices through the air. The car looks good, even without origami flame surfacing or chromed-up fender vents. There's just enough brightwork outside, and Infiniti has done an admirable job of giving all its sedans a familial resemblance. Indeed, a quick glance might register a distinct G-note to the uninformed onlooker, but the M is less swoopy, more square and, of course, bigger. Knee-jerk shoppers might default to a Lexus or something from Deutschland, but the M35 is a well turned-out package that usually garners the response "oh yeah" when mentioned. It's competitive in its class, though the quiet styling may be off-putting to buyers looking for more presence. If understatement is appealing, the M35 has the potential to be a temptress to true car people. The 3.5-liter V6 is fitted further towards the firewall and the driven wheels are in the proper place. The details are attended to both inside and out, making the M35 feel fussed over, like a quality piece of machinery. Evidence of this is found in the scalloped rim around the gauges and the super tight body panel gaps -- the kind of minutiae that analytical personalities get excited about. Nissan's widely-praised VQ35HR V6 delivers more wallop than the spec sheet suggests, with the revised mill feeling significantly stronger than its claimed 303 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. The seven-speed automatic gearbox offers a wide spread of ratios and a loafing, relaxed highway cruise. Around town and on the open road, the transmission is wonderfully responsive and quick about its business without snapping your head back, and when the mood strikes you, there's a manual mode that can be controlled through a set of steering wheel-mounted paddles. Downshifts bring rev matches, so you can feel like a hero even if you don't know how to heel-toe, and a Drive Sport shift mode brings the aggression when you're ready to forget about wafting and get down to business. The leather-wrapped, button-laden steering wheel is connected to a rack that can feel overly light and slightly numb one moment, and near perfect the next. The helm's wonkiness is disappointing in a vehicle that works incredibly well otherwise. There's tramlining as the wheels follow ruts and it's sometimes difficult to put the M35 on a …Hide Full Review