SRT10 2dr Coupe
2008 Dodge Viper

2008 Viper Photos
Dodge Viper ACR – Click above for high-res image gallery I have to admit that I'm biased when it comes to the Dodge Viper. I've had a soft spot for the venomous snake since the GTS coupe hit the streets in 1996. The aggressive design, powerful 8.0-liter V10 with 450 horsepower (doesn't sound like much now, but it sure seemed like a lot then), and the blue paint scheme with white racing stripes were the ideal combination for my dream sports car. I'm going to be that guy at the 2030 Barrett-Jackson purchasing a mint, low-mileage, numbers-matching 1996 or 1997 Dodge Viper GTS, and, of course, you'll be the one watching on SPEED commenting how I'm paying way too much for a classic American muscle car. %Gallery-29153% All photos Copyright ©2008 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. My personal fantasy aside, the Viper has made a lot of progress since then. Some of its raw, uncivilized nature had been removed when a more refined suspension and modern features like ABS brakes were added in 2003. The V10 engine was updated, getting a bump in displacement to 8.3 liters and an increase of 50 horsepower. Its redesign in 2003 also saw the Viper's aggressive look somewh at tamed, with less curves and the absence of a coupe. My obsession with the Viper waned, even with the re-introduction of the coupe in 2006 and the upgrade to 600 horsepower in 2008. The current SRT10 will outperform the old GTS any day, but there is a pure aggressiveness and brutality about the original Viper that the newer versions just don't have. That is, of course, until the introduction of the ACR (American Club Racer) version at last year's LA Auto Show. It's by far the most potent production Viper ever built, and for me it was love at first sight. The front splitter, asymmetrical stripe, and massive rear wing make the ACR the most aggressive looking Viper by far. In fact, it makes the previous generation ACR that was built from 1999-2002 look downright civilized. So what makes the new ACR so special? Even the slightest glance will tell you this is no ordinary Viper. This particular car came in Viper Black with the unique two-tone paint scheme. The ACR can also be ordered in Viper Red, Viper Violet, Viper Bright Blue Metallic and Viper Very Orange, with only the Black and Red having the option of the two-tone paint. I haven't seen the ACR in anything but Red or Black, and can't imagine ordering it any color combo besides the one seen here. But enough about paint schemes; the ACR is about one thing and one thing only: functionality. More specifically, putting down all that power from the 8.4-liter V10 to the pavement. To do this, the SRT team focused on aerodynamics, the result of which can be seen at both ends of the car. Up front is a carbon fiber splitter and dive planes that have been specially designed to increase …
Full Review
Dodge Viper ACR – Click above for high-res image gallery I have to admit that I'm biased when it comes to the Dodge Viper. I've had a soft spot for the venomous snake since the GTS coupe hit the streets in 1996. The aggressive design, powerful 8.0-liter V10 with 450 horsepower (doesn't sound like much now, but it sure seemed like a lot then), and the blue paint scheme with white racing stripes were the ideal combination for my dream sports car. I'm going to be that guy at the 2030 Barrett-Jackson purchasing a mint, low-mileage, numbers-matching 1996 or 1997 Dodge Viper GTS, and, of course, you'll be the one watching on SPEED commenting how I'm paying way too much for a classic American muscle car. %Gallery-29153% All photos Copyright ©2008 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. My personal fantasy aside, the Viper has made a lot of progress since then. Some of its raw, uncivilized nature had been removed when a more refined suspension and modern features like ABS brakes were added in 2003. The V10 engine was updated, getting a bump in displacement to 8.3 liters and an increase of 50 horsepower. Its redesign in 2003 also saw the Viper's aggressive look somewh at tamed, with less curves and the absence of a coupe. My obsession with the Viper waned, even with the re-introduction of the coupe in 2006 and the upgrade to 600 horsepower in 2008. The current SRT10 will outperform the old GTS any day, but there is a pure aggressiveness and brutality about the original Viper that the newer versions just don't have. That is, of course, until the introduction of the ACR (American Club Racer) version at last year's LA Auto Show. It's by far the most potent production Viper ever built, and for me it was love at first sight. The front splitter, asymmetrical stripe, and massive rear wing make the ACR the most aggressive looking Viper by far. In fact, it makes the previous generation ACR that was built from 1999-2002 look downright civilized. So what makes the new ACR so special? Even the slightest glance will tell you this is no ordinary Viper. This particular car came in Viper Black with the unique two-tone paint scheme. The ACR can also be ordered in Viper Red, Viper Violet, Viper Bright Blue Metallic and Viper Very Orange, with only the Black and Red having the option of the two-tone paint. I haven't seen the ACR in anything but Red or Black, and can't imagine ordering it any color combo besides the one seen here. But enough about paint schemes; the ACR is about one thing and one thing only: functionality. More specifically, putting down all that power from the 8.4-liter V10 to the pavement. To do this, the SRT team focused on aerodynamics, the result of which can be seen at both ends of the car. Up front is a carbon fiber splitter and dive planes that have been specially designed to increase …
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Retail Price

$86,295 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 8.4LV-10
MPG 13 City / 22 Hwy
Seating 2 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd man w/OD
Power 600 @ 6100 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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