ES 4dr Front-wheel Drive
2007 Mitsubishi Outlander

MSRP ?

$21,370
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EngineEngine 3.0LV-6
MPGMPG 20 City / 27 Hwy
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2007 Outlander Overview

Larger and more powerful than the model it replaces, Mitsubishi has aimed its Outlander at bigger game. Where last year's model had Subaru dead in its sights, the 2007 model is taking on Toyota's RAV-4 and Honda's CR-V. So what makes the Outlander shoppable against those two best-sellers? They're about equal on options and pricing, but the Toyota is less fun even with its V6 option, and the four-cylinder Honda doesn't even offer a third row seat, no matter how useless those extra seats are in these smallish CUVs. The Outlander's looks have moved away from the "toughwagon" genre dominated by the aforementioned Subies towards the sporty mini-ute segment. Its side windows are tall, but the rear-leaning back window adds a look of speed. The standard roof rack, while practical, also improves the Outlander's looks with a bit of shine on top. A roof spoiler and 18" wheels help accentuate the car's sporty intentions. %Gallery-3833% On the XLS model we had, keyless entry lets you leave the fob in your pocket or purse. Place your hand on either of the front door handles, and the car magically unlocks. A push of the small, rubber-covered button on the handle locks it. At first this option might seem a bit frivolous and gadgety, but the first time you have a sleeping baby in one arm and a grocery bag in the other, you'll be thankful for the expense. We just wish the rear door handles were touch-sensitive, as well. In the sleeping-baby scenario, you first must open a front door, then open the back – still easier than fishing for the keys, but the process could be a bit improved. The Outlander's interior is both a strong and weak point, mixing near-luxury touches with cheapness. The soft leather seats were supportive and comfortable, but the dashboard, door panels and interior door handles felt cheap and flimsy. The small, shallow storage bin above the controls is a nice touch, but we wonder how long its plastic cover will hold up. In fact, our tester's was already warping a little, possibly due to the hot southern sun. Cupholders are lined with sound-deadening rubber, but it's permanently in place and can't be removed for easier cleaning. Overall, however, it's a nice looking place to spend a few miles. The black leather contrasts well with the metallic trim throughout the cabin. The wife and I agreed, however, it could have been a bit more matte. At some angles, the sunlight glinting off dash pieces on either side of the steering could almost blind the driver. Give the kids some sand paper, and it's no longer a problem. The driver scores a nice beefy, leather-wrapped steering wheel and two gorgeous metal paddle shifters to control the 6-speed Sportronic transmission. Audio and cruise control buttons are right there on the spokes, as is the Bluetooth handsfree button, which we'll get to in a bit. Maintenance information as well as odometer and mileage estimates are displayed on an LED …
Full Review

2007 Outlander Overview

Larger and more powerful than the model it replaces, Mitsubishi has aimed its Outlander at bigger game. Where last year's model had Subaru dead in its sights, the 2007 model is taking on Toyota's RAV-4 and Honda's CR-V. So what makes the Outlander shoppable against those two best-sellers? They're about equal on options and pricing, but the Toyota is less fun even with its V6 option, and the four-cylinder Honda doesn't even offer a third row seat, no matter how useless those extra seats are in these smallish CUVs. The Outlander's looks have moved away from the "toughwagon" genre dominated by the aforementioned Subies towards the sporty mini-ute segment. Its side windows are tall, but the rear-leaning back window adds a look of speed. The standard roof rack, while practical, also improves the Outlander's looks with a bit of shine on top. A roof spoiler and 18" wheels help accentuate the car's sporty intentions. %Gallery-3833% On the XLS model we had, keyless entry lets you leave the fob in your pocket or purse. Place your hand on either of the front door handles, and the car magically unlocks. A push of the small, rubber-covered button on the handle locks it. At first this option might seem a bit frivolous and gadgety, but the first time you have a sleeping baby in one arm and a grocery bag in the other, you'll be thankful for the expense. We just wish the rear door handles were touch-sensitive, as well. In the sleeping-baby scenario, you first must open a front door, then open the back – still easier than fishing for the keys, but the process could be a bit improved. The Outlander's interior is both a strong and weak point, mixing near-luxury touches with cheapness. The soft leather seats were supportive and comfortable, but the dashboard, door panels and interior door handles felt cheap and flimsy. The small, shallow storage bin above the controls is a nice touch, but we wonder how long its plastic cover will hold up. In fact, our tester's was already warping a little, possibly due to the hot southern sun. Cupholders are lined with sound-deadening rubber, but it's permanently in place and can't be removed for easier cleaning. Overall, however, it's a nice looking place to spend a few miles. The black leather contrasts well with the metallic trim throughout the cabin. The wife and I agreed, however, it could have been a bit more matte. At some angles, the sunlight glinting off dash pieces on either side of the steering could almost blind the driver. Give the kids some sand paper, and it's no longer a problem. The driver scores a nice beefy, leather-wrapped steering wheel and two gorgeous metal paddle shifters to control the 6-speed Sportronic transmission. Audio and cruise control buttons are right there on the spokes, as is the Bluetooth handsfree button, which we'll get to in a bit. Maintenance information as well as odometer and mileage estimates are displayed on an LED …Hide Full Review