If you have cloth seats, they're going to get dirty. Here's how to remove stains and grime from your fabric seats. Watch all our Autoblog Details videos for more quick car care tips from professional detailer Larry Kosilla.

Materials Used In This Video:
Show full PR text
[00:00:00] One thing I can guarantee is that if you have cloth seats, they're gonna get dirty. On today's episode, we're gonna walk you through the step-by-step process for removing dirt and grime from your fabric seats. Coming up on Autoblog Details. My name is Larry Kosilla and I'm a professional detailer. Together with Autoblog, we're creating the ultimate collection of quick car care videos. This is Autoblog Details.

[00:00:30] Here are the items you'll need for this task. To start off, make sure the fabric is free and clear of loose debris by vacuuming first. Open the seams of the seat bottom with your fingers and slide the vacuum nozzle into the crease to remove hidden dirt prior to using cleaning liquids. Lightly spray the area with a specific fabric and cloth cleaning solution. The most common mistake is to use an all-purpose cleaner in these situations. The trick to cleaning seats and carpet is

[00:01:00] to avoid allowing the fabric cleaning liquid to saturate or over-soak the area being cleaned. Our goal is to clean the top layer of fabric, but leave the underlying cushion as dry as possible to avoid future mold or potential smells down the road. So, work one small area at a time. After applying four or five sprays of fabric cleaner to the seat, immediately massage the area with a soft or medium stiff interior brush. This will agitate the dirt to the surface, but will not hurt the integrity of the fiber themselves.

[00:01:30] Avoid using stiff bristle carpet brushes as they tend to damage the fibers and cause the cloth to fray. As the suds encapsulate the dirt that was pulled up by the brush, you must immediately scoop up the dirty suds with a clean microfiber towel before it dries
and reattaches to the fabric. Repeat this process until the seat has released all of the dirt. If a stain persists, an interior scrub pad can be used for extra power, but be
careful not to push too hard and damage the fibers. Light to medium strokes should be enough

[00:02:00] to loosen even the most stubborn of stains. Once the dirt is removed and the color has been restored, quickly vacuum the area once again to remove any areas of heavy saturation, and to pull the fibers up to help wick any remaining moisture away from the fabric. Be sure to give your seats some time to dry before you go for a ride, as no one likes a wet butt. For more how-to car care videos, visit autoblog.com/details. I'm Larry Kosilla from ammonyc.com. As always, thanks for watching guys. We'll see you next time. [00:02:27]

Share This Photo X