• Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
  • Image Credit: Mini
Of all the automakers we've talked with so far, Mini seems to sell the largest percentage of its cars with a manual transmission. A representative from the company shared numbers with us that show 11% of its 2019 sales have featured a stick. That beats Subaru's 7%, Volkswagen's 5% and Honda's 2.6%. It likely helps that Mini is a more niche brand, and it offers a manual on nearly every version of its cars. Still, it's sad that 89% of Mini owners decided to get an automatic anyway.

The manual take rate between different models varies quite a bit. The high-performance John Cooper Works models are most frequently sold with a manual transmission. The two-door hardtop and convertible versions have the highest percentages for the JCW at 41% and 32%. The JCW Clubman and Countryman follow at 22% and 19%. We're not surprised that the fast versions of Minis are sold with a manual more often than others, but we're surprised that even with two in 10 JCW Clubman and Countryman models selling with one, Mini would drop the option from the new 301-horsepower versions.

Unsurprisingly, other trim levels aren't purchased with a stick as often. The least popular is the front-drive Cooper S Countryman at 0%, followed by the regular Cooper Countryman at 1%. Then there's the Cooper Clubman at 3%. Weirdly, the all-wheel-drive Countryman and Clubman models always have a higher percentage of manuals than the front-drive models, with differences ranging from 2% to 10%.

The two-door Minis are typically the most likely to sell with a manual even for core models. In the convertible, the 6% of regular Coopers are manual while 30% of the Cooper S are. That nearly matches the JCW convertible. For the hardtop, the regular Cooper's manual take rate is 11% and the Cooper S model's is 17%.

These numbers will probably drop in the short term, though. Mini announced that it's temporarily stopping imports of manual Minis due to some emissions calibration issues. After a few months, though, we expect the manual sales to bounce back.

MINI Information

MINI

Share This Photo X