• Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Aston Martin Valkyrie engine
  • The Valkyrie V 12 engine makes 1,000 horsepower.
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin is working with Cosworth to develop the Valkyrie engine, an engine (we now know) unlike that found in any other production car. Today it has shared some of the specifics. The naturally aspirated 6.5-liter V12 will make 1,000 horsepower and rev up to 11,100 rpm. We did the math, that's 153.8 horsepower per liter in a non-boosted car. Cue the jaws dropping to the floor. The first thought here goes to what this thing will sound like. Aston has us covered there with a video it tweeted out this morning, which you can play below.


We got a sneak preview awhile back of the sound, and this just confirms how awesome it's going to be. The noises bring us back to a time when F1 engines actually sounded good. Peak power is made at an astounding 10,500 rpm, so you'll want to rev it all the way up to the top before shifting. Torque is predictably much lower — it makes 546 pound-feet at 7,000 rpm, when most engines are either done or running out of steam. Numbers for the Valkyrie's hybrid system are still unavailable, so we'll have to wait to find out the combined output.

The large V12 weighs 454 pounds, and Aston says it's a fully stressed element of the chassis — removing the engine would literally split the car in two. Titanium connecting rods, F1-spec pistons and a billet-machined crankshaft that takes six months to produce are but a few highlights of the Cosworth engine. Aston Martin says the crankshaft is 50 percent lighter than the One-77's V12 rotating assembly.

Thankfully, we've been provided with a gallery of engine photos to drool over. Making such a ridiculous and powerful engine emissions-compliant enough for a road car is something every car enthusiast can appreciate. Naturally aspirated V12s are arguably one of the most satisfying engine configurations to have been put forth on this earth. One that revs to 11,100 rpm sounds like it could crack anybody's list of greatest road car engines ever. Aston Martin sounds hyped about it, and we don't blame them. This car, and this engine, are going to be monsters.

Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin Valkyrie
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin


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