• Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
  • Image Credit: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company. Photos by Mathieu Heurtault
Following the announcement of a Duesenberg that could go for more than $10 million at Pebble Beach, we have yet another historic car headed for the auction block at the venerable event. This is a 1966 Ferrari Dino Berlinetta GT, and it was the second prototype designed. It previewed the production 206 GT, and it could be yours if you have the means.

While the car looks very close to the production coupe, there are quite a number of differences. Compared with the production car, the prototype has its turn signals below the grille, and the taillights consist of three round lenses rather than two. They have a chrome rectangular background, too. The entire body looks to be a bit longer than the production car. Part of this may have to do with the fact that the 2.0-liter V6 in the middle is mounted longitudinally. In the production Dino, the engine was mounted transversely. The body has a more tapered tail, too, one that has less of a duck-tail spoiler integrated. Additional details not found on the production car are the chrome bars across on the side strakes and the large single windshield wiper. Even with these detail changes, the Dino prototype is still gorgeous, maybe even more so than the consumer version.

Now we come to the part of the post where we discuss the car's high price. For this rare piece of Ferrari history, Gooding and Company expects someone will spend between $2 million and $3 million. Obviously that's a lot of money, in fact it's twice what the Ferrari Aperta cost when it launched. But this is a truly one-of-a-kind car, and it has an important place in history in helping give us the first mid-engine V6 Ferrari. So, it might be worth it. If you agree and have the cash, be sure you get to the Gooding and Company auction on Aug. 24-25.

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