• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
Digital Trends interviewed Porsche GT-car boss Andreas Preuninger, and asked whether the lightweighting Weissach Package could find its way to non-RS cars. Preuninger might have loosed at least a few worms from the proverbial can when he told the site, "I won't rule out some lightweight package will find its way to other model lines in the future." Even though Preuninger added, "We have nothing planned yet, we're very busy; don't expect to see the Cayenne Weissach next month," the opening will have every 911 Turbo S Exclusive owner calling their dealers about coming model year changes.

Porsche introduced the Weissach Package as an $84,000 option on the $845,000 918 Spyder, shedding weight by deleting some features, swapping some metal parts for carbon fiber, and bolting on a set of magnesium wheels. The pack made a second appearance as a $31,000 option on the $188,550 911 GT2 RS last year, eliminating more than 60 pounds and taking that car to a Nürburgring record lap. This year, Porsche separated the package from the magnesium wheels, pricing the former at $18,000 and the latter at $13,000. Then the boffins graced the GT3 RS with similar revisions, resulting in a 40-pound weight loss and a sub-seven-minute 'Ring lap time.

One argument for the Weissach Package migrating to non-RS cars is that it's become an unexpected profit center for the carmaker. Preuninger explained the take rate on the 911 GT2 RS was more than 90 percent. Porsche only made 1,000 of those 700-horsepower coupes, meaning more than 900 buyers leveled up, and Preuninger expects similar uptake on the GT3 RS.

One holdup on expanding the Weissach Package is parts availability. Preuninger said being caught by surprise by the option's popularity caused issues at the parts factories, mainly concerning the wheels; the GT chief said "85 percent of the global magnesium wheel market, including race cars and motorcycles, is taken by Porsche for that option." And although Digital Trends' question focused on Porsche cars, we'd figure once the package got cleared for the general Porsche population, the feature would make even more sense as an SUV option — no one has yet gone wrong with lighter, faster, more expensive SUVs, as BMW can attest.

Hit Digital Trends for the rest of the interview in which Preuninger touches on Formula E, on stripping the carpet and glovebox out of a 911 in the name of weight saving, and how a lack of space at the build facility is one reason the GT3 RS will never get a manual transmission.

Porsche 911 Information

Porsche 911

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