• Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect - 1939 Porsche Type 64 60K10 from the Collection of Automuseum Prototyp, Hamburg. The Porsche Type 64 50K10 is the progenitor of all Porsches and the foundation of the Porsche aesthetic. It was built to compete in the 1939 Berlin-Rome endurance race, which was cancelled due to the outbreak of war. A mere three identical cars were built, each of which used a Volkswagen platform and a steamlined aluminum body designed by Erwin Komenda and crafted by Reutter. This car was reconstructed of major components from the second Type 64, which had been dismantled after World War II (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect - 1939 Porsche Type 64 60K10 from the Collection of Automuseum Prototyp, Hamburg. The Porsche Type 64 50K10 is the progenitor of all Porsches and the foundation of the Porsche aesthetic. It was built to compete in the 1939 Berlin-Rome endurance race, which was cancelled due to the outbreak of war. A mere three identical cars were built, each of which used a Volkswagen platform and a steamlined aluminum body designed by Erwin Komenda and crafted by Reutter. This car was reconstructed of major components from the second Type 64, which had been dismantled after World War II (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect - 1939 Porsche Type 64 60K10 from the Collection of Automuseum Prototyp, Hamburg. The Porsche Type 64 50K10 is the progenitor of all Porsches and the foundation of the Porsche aesthetic. It was built to compete in the 1939 Berlin-Rome endurance race, which was cancelled due to the outbreak of war. A mere three identical cars were built, each of which used a Volkswagen platform and a steamlined aluminum body designed by Erwin Komenda and crafted by Reutter. This car was reconstructed of major components from the second Type 64, which had been dismantled after World War II (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect - 1939 Porsche Type 64 60K10 from the Collection of Automuseum Prototyp, Hamburg. The Porsche Type 64 50K10 is the progenitor of all Porsches and the foundation of the Porsche aesthetic. It was built to compete in the 1939 Berlin-Rome endurance race, which was cancelled due to the outbreak of war. A mere three identical cars were built, each of which used a Volkswagen platform and a steamlined aluminum body designed by Erwin Komenda and crafted by Reutter. This car was reconstructed of major components from the second Type 64, which had been dismantled after World War II (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1964 Porsche 901, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of James G. and Rachel E. Stull. Looking to replace the aging 356, Ferry Porsche's son Ferdinand Alexander Porsche guided his design team in conceiving a vehicle that was distinct from the 356 but still unmistakably a Porsche. The car debuted at the 1963 Frankfurt Auto Show as the 901, but the model number was quickly changed to 911 after Peugeot claimed the rights to three-digit car designations with a "0" in the middle. The design of the car proved so enduring that the basic concept remains unchanged today despite continuous development (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1964 Porsche 901, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of James G. and Rachel E. Stull. Looking to replace the aging 356, Ferry Porsche's son Ferdinand Alexander Porsche guided his design team in conceiving a vehicle that was distinct from the 356 but still unmistakably a Porsche. The car debuted at the 1963 Frankfurt Auto Show as the 901, but the model number was quickly changed to 911 after Peugeot claimed the rights to three-digit car designations with a "0" in the middle. The design of the car proved so enduring that the basic concept remains unchanged today despite continuous development (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1964 Porsche 901, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of James G. and Rachel E. Stull. Looking to replace the aging 356, Ferry Porsche's son Ferdinand Alexander Porsche guided his design team in conceiving a vehicle that was distinct from the 356 but still unmistakably a Porsche. The car debuted at the 1963 Frankfurt Auto Show as the 901, but the model number was quickly changed to 911 after Peugeot claimed the rights to three-digit car designations with a "0" in the middle. The design of the car proved so enduring that the basic concept remains unchanged today despite continuous development (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1964 Porsche 901, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of James G. and Rachel E. Stull. Looking to replace the aging 356, Ferry Porsche's son Ferdinand Alexander Porsche guided his design team in conceiving a vehicle that was distinct from the 356 but still unmistakably a Porsche. The car debuted at the 1963 Frankfurt Auto Show as the 901, but the model number was quickly changed to 911 after Peugeot claimed the rights to three-digit car designations with a "0" in the middle. The design of the car proved so enduring that the basic concept remains unchanged today despite continuous development (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1949 Porsche 356-2 "Gmünd" Coupe, from the collection of Terri and Jeff Zwart. By 1944 Porsche design facilities had moved to Gmünd, Austria. There, with a renewed interest in creating a sports car from Volkswagen components, Ferry Porsche, engineer Karl Rabe, and body designer Erwin Komenda conceived the Type 356. The prototype 356-1 roadster had styling traits drawn from the pre-war Type 64 racer and many of these were carried into the production 356-2 coupes and cabriolets that followed. This example was the 50th "Gmünd" car and possibly the last built in Austria (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1949 Porsche 356-2 "Gmünd" Coupe, from the collection of Terri and Jeff Zwart. By 1944 Porsche design facilities had moved to Gmünd, Austria. There, with a renewed interest in creating a sports car from Volkswagen components, Ferry Porsche, engineer Karl Rabe, and body designer Erwin Komenda conceived the Type 356. The prototype 356-1 roadster had styling traits drawn from the pre-war Type 64 racer and many of these were carried into the production 356-2 coupes and cabriolets that followed. This example was the 50th "Gmünd" car and possibly the last built in Austria (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1949 Porsche 356-2 "Gmünd" Coupe, from the collection of Terri and Jeff Zwart. By 1944 Porsche design facilities had moved to Gmünd, Austria. There, with a renewed interest in creating a sports car from Volkswagen components, Ferry Porsche, engineer Karl Rabe, and body designer Erwin Komenda conceived the Type 356. The prototype 356-1 roadster had styling traits drawn from the pre-war Type 64 racer and many of these were carried into the production 356-2 coupes and cabriolets that followed. This example was the 50th "Gmünd" car and possibly the last built in Austria (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1976 Porsche 911 Turbo Carrera, from the collection of Brent Martini. Porsche began development of a turbo version of its 911 in 1972 after witnessing the success of turbocharging on its 917 race cars. Production began in 1975 but the model did not reach the U.S. until 1976. The body, while clearly descended from that of the 901/911, had more muscular contours to accommodate wider tires and a massive rear spoiler to improve roadholding. The car's dramatic design betrayed its exceptional performance and the Turbo Carrera was an immediate sensation (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1976 Porsche 911 Turbo Carrera, from the collection of Brent Martini. Porsche began development of a turbo version of its 911 in 1972 after witnessing the success of turbocharging on its 917 race cars. Production began in 1975 but the model did not reach the U.S. until 1976. The body, while clearly descended from that of the 901/911, had more muscular contours to accommodate wider tires and a massive rear spoiler to improve roadholding. The car's dramatic design betrayed its exceptional performance and the Turbo Carrera was an immediate sensation (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1976 Porsche 911 Turbo Carrera, from the collection of Brent Martini. Porsche began development of a turbo version of its 911 in 1972 after witnessing the success of turbocharging on its 917 race cars. Production began in 1975 but the model did not reach the U.S. until 1976. The body, while clearly descended from that of the 901/911, had more muscular contours to accommodate wider tires and a massive rear spoiler to improve roadholding. The car's dramatic design betrayed its exceptional performance and the Turbo Carrera was an immediate sensation (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2000 Porsche Carrera GT Prototype, from the collection of Bruce Canepa. The Carrera GT resulted from a challenge given to Porsche engineers and designers to create a supercar worthy of company whose vehicles had, by then, won Le Mans 16 times. The car was to embody the most advanced racing technology then available and a body shape that was unquestionably derived from the Porsche vehicle family. The result subtly embodied numerous 911 styling elements in a substantially more aggressive package. Of the two Carrera GT prototypes constructed, this car is the only survivor (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2000 Porsche Carrera GT Prototype, from the collection of Bruce Canepa. The Carrera GT resulted from a challenge given to Porsche engineers and designers to create a supercar worthy of company whose vehicles had, by then, won Le Mans 16 times. The car was to embody the most advanced racing technology then available and a body shape that was unquestionably derived from the Porsche vehicle family. The result subtly embodied numerous 911 styling elements in a substantially more aggressive package. Of the two Carrera GT prototypes constructed, this car is the only survivor (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2000 Porsche Carrera GT Prototype, from the collection of Bruce Canepa. The Carrera GT resulted from a challenge given to Porsche engineers and designers to create a supercar worthy of company whose vehicles had, by then, won Le Mans 16 times. The car was to embody the most advanced racing technology then available and a body shape that was unquestionably derived from the Porsche vehicle family. The result subtly embodied numerous 911 styling elements in a substantially more aggressive package. Of the two Carrera GT prototypes constructed, this car is the only survivor (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2000 Porsche Carrera GT Prototype, from the collection of Bruce Canepa. The Carrera GT resulted from a challenge given to Porsche engineers and designers to create a supercar worthy of company whose vehicles had, by then, won Le Mans 16 times. The car was to embody the most advanced racing technology then available and a body shape that was unquestionably derived from the Porsche vehicle family. The result subtly embodied numerous 911 styling elements in a substantially more aggressive package. Of the two Carrera GT prototypes constructed, this car is the only survivor (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1955 Porsche Continental Cabriolet, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of Sanford C. Sigoloff. Derived from the Porsche 356, the Continental was conceived by influential New York importer Max Hoffman who believed that the American market would be more likely to embrace a vehicle with an evocative name, rather than a mere number designation. Porsche was forced to re-badge the Continental when Ford informed them that they had already trademarked its name. As a result, few Continentals were produced and the name was briefly changed to "European", then back to 356 (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1955 Porsche Continental Cabriolet, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of Sanford C. Sigoloff. Derived from the Porsche 356, the Continental was conceived by influential New York importer Max Hoffman who believed that the American market would be more likely to embrace a vehicle with an evocative name, rather than a mere number designation. Porsche was forced to re-badge the Continental when Ford informed them that they had already trademarked its name. As a result, few Continentals were produced and the name was briefly changed to "European", then back to 356 (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1955 Porsche Continental Cabriolet, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of Sanford C. Sigoloff. Derived from the Porsche 356, the Continental was conceived by influential New York importer Max Hoffman who believed that the American market would be more likely to embrace a vehicle with an evocative name, rather than a mere number designation. Porsche was forced to re-badge the Continental when Ford informed them that they had already trademarked its name. As a result, few Continentals were produced and the name was briefly changed to "European", then back to 356 (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1955 Porsche Continental Cabriolet, from the collection of the Petersen Automotive Museum, gift of Sanford C. Sigoloff. Derived from the Porsche 356, the Continental was conceived by influential New York importer Max Hoffman who believed that the American market would be more likely to embrace a vehicle with an evocative name, rather than a mere number designation. Porsche was forced to re-badge the Continental when Ford informed them that they had already trademarked its name. As a result, few Continentals were produced and the name was briefly changed to "European", then back to 356 (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1968 Porsche 911S Targa Sportomatic, from the collection of Allan and Lisa Grant. Unable to satisfactorily engineer a 911 convertible, Porsche developed the Targa, a novel body type that offered open-air motoring without sacrificing structural rigidity while retaining the established 911 form. Anticipating U.S. safety regulations that never materialized, Porsche touted the Targa's built-in roll bar as a first-of-its-kind safety device. This car's Sportomatic manual transmission - extremely rare in a Targa - permits shifting without a clutch, a feature Porsche expected to resonate with American buyers (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1968 Porsche 911S Targa Sportomatic, from the collection of Allan and Lisa Grant. Unable to satisfactorily engineer a 911 convertible, Porsche developed the Targa, a novel body type that offered open-air motoring without sacrificing structural rigidity while retaining the established 911 form. Anticipating U.S. safety regulations that never materialized, Porsche touted the Targa's built-in roll bar as a first-of-its-kind safety device. This car's Sportomatic manual transmission - extremely rare in a Targa - permits shifting without a clutch, a feature Porsche expected to resonate with American buyers (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1968 Porsche 911S Targa Sportomatic, from the collection of Allan and Lisa Grant. Unable to satisfactorily engineer a 911 convertible, Porsche developed the Targa, a novel body type that offered open-air motoring without sacrificing structural rigidity while retaining the established 911 form. Anticipating U.S. safety regulations that never materialized, Porsche touted the Targa's built-in roll bar as a first-of-its-kind safety device. This car's Sportomatic manual transmission - extremely rare in a Targa - permits shifting without a clutch, a feature Porsche expected to resonate with American buyers (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1968 Porsche 911S Targa Sportomatic, from the collection of Allan and Lisa Grant. Unable to satisfactorily engineer a 911 convertible, Porsche developed the Targa, a novel body type that offered open-air motoring without sacrificing structural rigidity while retaining the established 911 form. Anticipating U.S. safety regulations that never materialized, Porsche touted the Targa's built-in roll bar as a first-of-its-kind safety device. This car's Sportomatic manual transmission - extremely rare in a Targa - permits shifting without a clutch, a feature Porsche expected to resonate with American buyers (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1955 Porsche 550/1500 RS Spyder, chassis #0073, from the Ingram Collection. The mid-engine 550 Spyder was the first production Porsche specially developed for racing. The aluminum body and tube-frame chassis reduced weight while the 110-horsepower four-cam flat-4 engine gave race-winning performance. Porsche also utilized wind tunnel testing to perfect the shape of the Spyder and improve airflow. The 550 was an overall success on the track, including this example which finished second in points in its SCCA class for the 1956 season (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1955 Porsche 550/1500 RS Spyder, chassis #0073, from the Ingram Collection. The mid-engine 550 Spyder was the first production Porsche specially developed for racing. The aluminum body and tube-frame chassis reduced weight while the 110-horsepower four-cam flat-4 engine gave race-winning performance. Porsche also utilized wind tunnel testing to perfect the shape of the Spyder and improve airflow. The 550 was an overall success on the track, including this example which finished second in points in its SCCA class for the 1956 season (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1966 Porsche 906 Carrera 6, chassis #134, from a private collection. The 906 was one in a series of lightweight race cars developed under Ferdinand Porsche's grandson, Ferdinand Piëch. Drag-reducing features included a generously rounded windscreen, cutoff "Kamm" tail and covered headlights. Its turbular space frame, which replaced the steel chassis of the 904, supported a lightweight fiberglass body. One of the original Ben Pon Racing Team Holland cars, #134 was raced by Gijs Lennep, later a Porsche factory driver and Le Mans winner (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1966 Porsche 906 Carrera 6, chassis #134, from a private collection. The 906 was one in a series of lightweight race cars developed under Ferdinand Porsche's grandson, Ferdinand Piëch. Drag-reducing features included a generously rounded windscreen, cutoff "Kamm" tail and covered headlights. Its turbular space frame, which replaced the steel chassis of the 904, supported a lightweight fiberglass body. One of the original Ben Pon Racing Team Holland cars, #134 was raced by Gijs Lennep, later a Porsche factory driver and Le Mans winner (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1969 Porsche 917K, chassis #015, from the collection of Bruce Canepa. Taking advantage of an FIA rule change allowing larger engines, Porsche developed a completely new race car: the legendary 917. Constructed of lightweight materials and powered by an air-cooled flat-twelve that generated nearly 600 horsepower, the 917 initially had handling problems due to aerodynamic lift. Changes to the tail designs improved stability and in 1970 a 917K delivered Porsche its first of 19 wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1969 Porsche 917K, chassis #015, from the collection of Bruce Canepa. Taking advantage of an FIA rule change allowing larger engines, Porsche developed a completely new race car: the legendary 917. Constructed of lightweight materials and powered by an air-cooled flat-twelve that generated nearly 600 horsepower, the 917 initially had handling problems due to aerodynamic lift. Changes to the tail designs improved stability and in 1970 a 917K delivered Porsche its first of 19 wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1983 Porsche 956, chassis #105, from the collection of Richard V. Harris and Trina B. Harris. When new FIA regulations rendered the 935 and 936 obsolete by 1982, Porsche built an all-new race car and their first with true monocoque construction. Engineers explored new aerodynamic principles and created a "ground effect" by using the shape of the floor pan to guide air under the car. Rather than reducing the speed of the car, the air stream created suction, keeping it firmly on the road. The 956 became one of the most successful race cars in history, winning Le Mans four times in a row (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1983 Porsche 956, chassis #105, from the collection of Richard V. Harris and Trina B. Harris. When new FIA regulations rendered the 935 and 936 obsolete by 1982, Porsche built an all-new race car and their first with true monocoque construction. Engineers explored new aerodynamic principles and created a "ground effect" by using the shape of the floor pan to guide air under the car. Rather than reducing the speed of the car, the air stream created suction, keeping it firmly on the road. The 956 became one of the most successful race cars in history, winning Le Mans four times in a row (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1985 Porsche 959 "Paris-Dakar", chassis #010014, from a private collection. A modified 911 4x4 captured overall victory in the 1984 Paris-Dakar Rally, Porsche's first desert race. At the time, Porsche was also developing a racer for the new Group B class, and used its experience with the 911 4x4 in engineering the resulting 1985 959 rally car. Technically advanced for its day, the 959 featured electronically controlled all-wheel-drive and, for 1986, an innovative sequential turbocharging system. Porsche 959s finished 1st, 2nd, and 6th in the 1986 Paris-Dakar Rally (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1985 Porsche 959 "Paris-Dakar", chassis #010014, from a private collection. A modified 911 4x4 captured overall victory in the 1984 Paris-Dakar Rally, Porsche's first desert race. At the time, Porsche was also developing a racer for the new Group B class, and used its experience with the 911 4x4 in engineering the resulting 1985 959 rally car. Technically advanced for its day, the 959 featured electronically controlled all-wheel-drive and, for 1986, an innovative sequential turbocharging system. Porsche 959s finished 1st, 2nd, and 6th in the 1986 Paris-Dakar Rally (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2008 Porsche RS Spyder, chassis #802, from the collection of Penske Racing Inc. In 2005 Porsche developed the RS Spyder entirely in-house to meet the LMP2 (Le Mans Prototype 2) category rules. As a privateer (non-factory) class, LMP2 was off limits to Porsche directly. A partnership with Penske Motorsport offered a solution, with Porsche maintaining exposure and Penske making a triumphant return to racing. Over three seasons, RS Spyders delivered 24 class wins and 11 overall wins, in addition to winning the manufacturers, drivers and team championships all three years (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2008 Porsche RS Spyder, chassis #802, from the collection of Penske Racing Inc. In 2005 Porsche developed the RS Spyder entirely in-house to meet the LMP2 (Le Mans Prototype 2) category rules. As a privateer (non-factory) class, LMP2 was off limits to Porsche directly. A partnership with Penske Motorsport offered a solution, with Porsche maintaining exposure and Penske making a triumphant return to racing. Over three seasons, RS Spyders delivered 24 class wins and 11 overall wins, in addition to winning the manufacturers, drivers and team championships all three years (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2015 Porsche 919 Hybrid, chassis #1506, from the collecton of Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche AG. The 919 Hybrid was constructed for use at the legendary Le Mans 24-hour endurance race in the Prototype 1 Hybrid category. Power comes from a 500-horsepower four-cylinder turbocharged gasoline engine and a 400+ horsepower electric motor that derives power from a combination of reclaimed braking and exhaust energy. During the 2015 season, this 919 Hybrid won the 6 Hours of Nürburgring, 6 Hours of Circuit of the Americas, and 6 Hours of Fuji, and came in second at Le Mans (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2015 Porsche 919 Hybrid, chassis #1506, from the collecton of Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche AG. The 919 Hybrid was constructed for use at the legendary Le Mans 24-hour endurance race in the Prototype 1 Hybrid category. Power comes from a 500-horsepower four-cylinder turbocharged gasoline engine and a 400+ horsepower electric motor that derives power from a combination of reclaimed braking and exhaust energy. During the 2015 season, this 919 Hybrid won the 6 Hours of Nürburgring, 6 Hours of Circuit of the Americas, and 6 Hours of Fuji, and came in second at Le Mans (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 935 K3, from the collection of Bruce Meyer. Overall winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1979, this 935 K3 survives as one of the foremost examples of racing success bolstering Porsche's image of excellence. The 935, which competed in the Group 5 production-based car class, was the ultimate 911-based racer of its era and one of very few production cars to win Le Mans overall. Its "K" designation refers to Germany's Kremer Racing, a shop that modified and developed a variety of Porsches for use by "privateers" (teams without formal factory support) (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 935 K3, from the collection of Bruce Meyer. Overall winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1979, this 935 K3 survives as one of the foremost examples of racing success bolstering Porsche's image of excellence. The 935, which competed in the Group 5 production-based car class, was the ultimate 911-based racer of its era and one of very few production cars to win Le Mans overall. Its "K" designation refers to Germany's Kremer Racing, a shop that modified and developed a variety of Porsches for use by "privateers" (teams without formal factory support) (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 935 K3, from the collection of Bruce Meyer. Overall winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1979, this 935 K3 survives as one of the foremost examples of racing success bolstering Porsche's image of excellence. The 935, which competed in the Group 5 production-based car class, was the ultimate 911-based racer of its era and one of very few production cars to win Le Mans overall. Its "K" designation refers to Germany's Kremer Racing, a shop that modified and developed a variety of Porsches for use by "privateers" (teams without formal factory support) (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 935 K3, from the collection of Bruce Meyer. Overall winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1979, this 935 K3 survives as one of the foremost examples of racing success bolstering Porsche's image of excellence. The 935, which competed in the Group 5 production-based car class, was the ultimate 911-based racer of its era and one of very few production cars to win Le Mans overall. Its "K" designation refers to Germany's Kremer Racing, a shop that modified and developed a variety of Porsches for use by "privateers" (teams without formal factory support) (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo, from the collection of Brent Martini. By the late 1970s, Porsche's 911 Turbo had evolved into what even today remains one of the most iconic versions of the 911. Exceedingly muscular in appearance and adorned with a massive "tea tray" rear spoiler, the car conveyed power and aggression while remaining true to the iconography of its heritage. This distinctive aesthetic accurately conveyed the Turbo's extreme performance and has fostered regard for its silhouette as that of the quintessential sports car (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo, from the collection of Brent Martini. By the late 1970s, Porsche's 911 Turbo had evolved into what even today remains one of the most iconic versions of the 911. Exceedingly muscular in appearance and adorned with a massive "tea tray" rear spoiler, the car conveyed power and aggression while remaining true to the iconography of its heritage. This distinctive aesthetic accurately conveyed the Turbo's extreme performance and has fostered regard for its silhouette as that of the quintessential sports car (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo, from the collection of Brent Martini. By the late 1970s, Porsche's 911 Turbo had evolved into what even today remains one of the most iconic versions of the 911. Exceedingly muscular in appearance and adorned with a massive "tea tray" rear spoiler, the car conveyed power and aggression while remaining true to the iconography of its heritage. This distinctive aesthetic accurately conveyed the Turbo's extreme performance and has fostered regard for its silhouette as that of the quintessential sports car (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo, from the collection of Brent Martini. By the late 1970s, Porsche's 911 Turbo had evolved into what even today remains one of the most iconic versions of the 911. Exceedingly muscular in appearance and adorned with a massive "tea tray" rear spoiler, the car conveyed power and aggression while remaining true to the iconography of its heritage. This distinctive aesthetic accurately conveyed the Turbo's extreme performance and has fostered regard for its silhouette as that of the quintessential sports car (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster, from the collection of Chad McQueen. Celebrity ownership of a car often elevates the esteem in which that car's brand is held, a cultural effect enjoyed by Porsche when "the King of Cool" - actor Steve McQueen - acquired this Speedster. McQueen bought the car with income derived from acting and used it to pursue his passion for racing. His competitive successes in the Speedster at Santa Barbara, Del Mar, Willow Springs and Laguna Seca served to magnify perceptions of Porsche's automobiles as both desirable and capable (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster, from the collection of Chad McQueen. Celebrity ownership of a car often elevates the esteem in which that car's brand is held, a cultural effect enjoyed by Porsche when "the King of Cool" - actor Steve McQueen - acquired this Speedster. McQueen bought the car with income derived from acting and used it to pursue his passion for racing. His competitive successes in the Speedster at Santa Barbara, Del Mar, Willow Springs and Laguna Seca served to magnify perceptions of Porsche's automobiles as both desirable and capable (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1987 Porsche 928 H50 Study, from the collection of Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche AG. Porsche's first front-engine "family" car was a one-off 928-based concept dubbed the 942. It had full seating for four but only two doors and was presented to Ferry Porsche by his staff for his 75th birthday in 1984. Three years later, Porsche expanded on the idea with the 928 H50 Study ondisplay, a feasibility experiment with four doors for improved access to the rear seats. Though no intended for series production, it is regarded as an early precursor to the modern Panamera (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1987 Porsche 928 H50 Study, from the collection of Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche AG. Porsche's first front-engine "family" car was a one-off 928-based concept dubbed the 942. It had full seating for four but only two doors and was presented to Ferry Porsche by his staff for his 75th birthday in 1984. Three years later, Porsche expanded on the idea with the 928 H50 Study ondisplay, a feasibility experiment with four doors for improved access to the rear seats. Though no intended for series production, it is regarded as an early precursor to the modern Panamera (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1987 Porsche 928 H50 Study, from the collection of Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche AG. Porsche's first front-engine "family" car was a one-off 928-based concept dubbed the 942. It had full seating for four but only two doors and was presented to Ferry Porsche by his staff for his 75th birthday in 1984. Three years later, Porsche expanded on the idea with the 928 H50 Study ondisplay, a feasibility experiment with four doors for improved access to the rear seats. Though no intended for series production, it is regarded as an early precursor to the modern Panamera (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1987 Porsche 928 H50 Study, from the collection of Dr. Ing. H.C.F. Porsche AG. Porsche's first front-engine "family" car was a one-off 928-based concept dubbed the 942. It had full seating for four but only two doors and was presented to Ferry Porsche by his staff for his 75th birthday in 1984. Three years later, Porsche expanded on the idea with the 928 H50 Study ondisplay, a feasibility experiment with four doors for improved access to the rear seats. Though no intended for series production, it is regarded as an early precursor to the modern Panamera (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2016 Porsche 911 GTS Club Coupe, courtesy of Richard T. Horowitz. The GTS Club Coupe's very existence demonstrates the close relationship between Porsche and the Porsche Club of America (PCA). Porsche produced the car in honor of the PCA's 60th anniversary in 2015. Based on the 911 Carrera GTS, the Club Coupe features a unique bright hue known as "Club Blau" (Club Blue) along with a number of distinctive trim pieces. Porsche offered 59 for sale to PCA members via a lottery system, and one lucky PCA winner received a Club Coupe for free (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 2016 Porsche 911 GTS Club Coupe, courtesy of Richard T. Horowitz. The GTS Club Coupe's very existence demonstrates the close relationship between Porsche and the Porsche Club of America (PCA). Porsche produced the car in honor of the PCA's 60th anniversary in 2015. Based on the 911 Carrera GTS, the Club Coupe features a unique bright hue known as "Club Blau" (Club Blue) along with a number of distinctive trim pieces. Porsche offered 59 for sale to PCA members via a lottery system, and one lucky PCA winner received a Club Coupe for free (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1985 Porsche 911JR, courtesy of Lizett Bond and Kerry Morse. During the 1980s Porsche produced small numbers of 936JR and 911JR motorized children's cars, each a faithful scaled-down reproduction of its namesake. The 911JR featured a 2.2-horsepower Honda gasoline engine, a 3-speed manual transmission, disc brakes, rack-and-pinion steering and coil spring suspension at all four wheels (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • 1985 Porsche 911JR, courtesy of Lizett Bond and Kerry Morse. During the 1980s Porsche produced small numbers of 936JR and 911JR motorized children's cars, each a faithful scaled-down reproduction of its namesake. The 911JR featured a 2.2-horsepower Honda gasoline engine, a 3-speed manual transmission, disc brakes, rack-and-pinion steering and coil spring suspension at all four wheels (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Petersen Museum: The Porsche Effect
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
LOS ANGELES — There may be no hotter marque than Porsche at the moment, with classic models skyrocketing in price and new models in higher demand than ever. So it was no surprise when the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles announced its newest exhibition would highlight the Stuttgart automaker. The museum has done a stellar job of gathering vehicles for new exhibits since its remodel two years ago, the "Seeing Red: 70 Years of Ferrari" display coming quickly to mind.

The Petersen hasn't disappointed with "The Porsche Effect," either. The collection of cars provides an expansive look at the company's history both with street cars and on the track, starting with a 1939 Porsche Type 64 60K10, essentially the company's first prototype, to a 2016 Porsche 911 GTS Club Coupe, and everything in between. There are Le Mans winners like Bruce Meyer's 1979 Porsche 935 K3, a 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster once owned by Steve McQueen (and currently in possession of his son, Chad McQueen), the only remaining Porsche Carrera GT Prototype, and so much more. Plus, if you sign up for one of the daily vault tours, you can see even more Porsches that didn't make it into the main display, including numerous rare race cars and several custom Porsches like Singer Vehicle Design founder Rob Dickinson's personal hot-rodded 911 or Rod Emory's very first 356 Outlaw.

We've highlighted several of our favorites from the exhibit below, and you can see our expansive photo gallery from our visit in the gallery above. "The Porsche Effect" is set to run through January 2019. For more details on visiting the museum visit www.petersen.org or call 323-930-CARS.


Petersen Museum Porsche Effect

1939 Porsche Type 64 60K10 — From the Collection of Automuseum Prototyp, Hamburg. The Porsche Type 64 50K10 is the progenitor of all Porsches and the foundation of the Porsche aesthetic. It was built to compete in the 1939 Berlin-Rome endurance race, which was canceled due to the outbreak of war. A mere three identical cars were built, each of which used a Volkswagen platform and a streamlined aluminum body designed by Erwin Komenda and crafted by Reutter. This car was reconstructed of major components from the second Type 64, which had been dismantled after World War II.

Petersen Museum Porsche Effect

1979 Porsche 935 K3 — From the collection of Bruce Meyer. Overall winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1979, this 935 K3 survives as one of the foremost examples of racing success bolstering Porsche's image of excellence. The 935, which competed in the Group 5 production-based car class, was the ultimate 911-based racer of its era and one of very few production cars to win Le Mans overall. Its "K" designation refers to Germany's Kremer Racing, a shop that modified and developed a variety of Porsches for use by "privateers" (teams without formal factory support).

Petersen Museum Porsche Effect

1949 Porsche 356-2 "Gmünd" Coupe — From the collection of Terri and Jeff Zwart. By 1944, Porsche design facilities had moved to Gmünd, Austria. There, with a renewed interest in creating a sports car from Volkswagen components, Ferry Porsche, engineer Karl Rabe and body designer Erwin Komenda conceived the Type 356. The prototype 356-1 roadster had styling traits drawn from the pre-war Type 64 racer, and many of these were carried into the production 356-2 coupes and cabriolets that followed. This example was the 50th "Gmünd" car and possibly the last built in Austria.

Petersen Museum Porsche Effect

1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster — From the collection of Chad McQueen. Celebrity ownership of a car often elevates the esteem in which that car's brand is held, a cultural effect enjoyed by Porsche when "the King of Cool" — actor Steve McQueen — acquired this Speedster. McQueen bought the car with income derived from acting and used it to pursue his passion for racing. His competitive successes in the Speedster at Santa Barbara, Del Mar, Willow Springs and Laguna Seca served to magnify perceptions of Porsche's automobiles as both desirable and capable.

Petersen Museum Porsche Effect

1969 Porsche 917K, chassis #015 — From the collection of Bruce Canepa. Taking advantage of an FIA rule change allowing larger engines, Porsche developed a completely new race car: the legendary 917. Constructed of lightweight materials and powered by an air-cooled flat-12 that generated nearly 600 horsepower, the 917 initially had handling problems due to aerodynamic lift. Changes to the tail designs improved stability, and in 1970 a 917K delivered Porsche its first of 19 wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Vehicle descriptions courtesy of the Petersen Museum.

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