• Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
  • Image Credit: Aston Martin
Aston Martin has turned its eye to the inline six-cylinder engine Mercedes-Benz installs in the CLS 53. The British carmaker uses an AMG-sourced 4.0-liter V8 for the DB11 and the Vantage, which produces 503 horsepower and 505 pound-feet of torque in the latter coupe. Aston Martin hasn't said anything about whether or when it would use the inline-six, nor mentioned a product to slot the engine into. If the six does migrate from Germany to England, the move brings several benefits for Aston Martin, and it would create the first six-pot Aston Martin since the 1999 DB7.

The 3.0-liter, AMG-built six-cylinder uses an electric turbocharger to put out 430 hp and 383 lb-ft of torque, and gets help from a 48-volt EQ Boost micro-hybrid system throwing in 21 hp and 184 lb-ft. After driving it at a Mercedes-Benz test track, Aston Martin's chief engineer Matt Becker called the powerplant "very complicated and clever," and said, "it's a very impressive engine" that he could envision serving the brand. The 2019 Vantage engine bay can already fit the company's in-house, 5.2-liter V12, so a straight-six shouldn't be hard to swallow.

As for how it would fit into the lineup, there's a chance a six-cylinder Vantage supplants the V8. However, since Becker said his engineering team "would not necessarily play" with the AMG's power curves, that option would probably have to wait until AMG upped the three-liters' output. We'd be surprised if Vantage buyers would accept giving up two cylinders and 73 hp. More likely, a six-cylinder Vantage could give Aston Martin a new entry-level model to undercut the $153,081 Vantage V8, but with plenty of ponies to thrill. A V6 coupe could also help the carmaker's emissions scores, and serve specific markets such as China where engine displacements greater than three liters get hit with heavy taxes.

Related Video:

Aston Martin V8 Vantage Information

Aston Martin V8 Vantage

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