• Image Credit: FCA
  • Image Credit: FCA
  • Image Credit: FCA
  • Image Credit: © 2017 FCA US LLC
  •   Engine
    5.7L V8
  •   Power
    395 HP / 410 LB-FT
  •   Transmission
    8-Speed Automatic
  •   Drivetrain
    Four-Wheel Drive
  •   Engine Placement
    Front
  •   Seating
    2+3
  •   MPG
    15 City / 21 Highway
  •   Warranty
    3 Year / 36,000 Mile - Basic
  •   Base Price
    $54,990
  •   As Tested Price
    $62,200
The Ram 1500 is the oldest of the Big Three trucks, debuting back in 2009. There have been some pretty heavy updates since then, most notably in 2013. This particular truck is the Laramie Longhorn trim, which is only eclipsed by the Limited model in the Ram 1500 lineup. It comes with a number of love it or hate it accoutrements and trim pieces. While a diesel V6 is available, this model has the tried-and-true 5.7-liter Hemi V8. In this guise, it makes 395 horsepower and 410 pound-feet of torque.

On top of all that, our tester has the $1,125 Southfork package. This nets you big chrome "Longhorn" lettering across the tailgate, walnut veneer trim, leather-wrapped grab handles and new floormats. Other options on this truck include monotone paint, a tonneau cover, a limited-slip differential, air suspension and the Ram Box storage areas on the sides of the bed.

Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: The Ram remains my favorite pickup truck. It's the oldest in the market, but I still feel like it's the best. It's tough, capable, comfortable and the most distinctive of the Big Three pickups. The chrome, leather and Hemi V8 go together like meat, potatoes and a Caesar salad. It exudes strength yet still has a refined quality. Every time I drive a Ram, I expect it to start showing its age. It never does, and the new one's already coming early next year.

My night in the Ram Laramie Longhorn Southfork edition was pretty chill. The Hemi delivered when I took off aggressively from lights, Uconnect was easy to use, and the rich interior was a comfy place to spend time when rush hour traffic weighed me down. The Southfork package adds a bit of bling, with flashy 20-inch aluminum wheels with silver inserts and chrome side steps, among other features. Plus, "Longhorn" is spelled out across the tailgate, which is cool. The truck is branded, like a steer, and it definitely makes a statement. On the downside, there's belt buckles on the seat backs, which starts to get a bit cheesy.

Associate Editor Reese Counts: I really like the Ram. Like Greg, it remains my favorite full-size pickup truck. It's handsome, it rides supremely well and every available engine is a peach. This class of trucks is a little too large for my lifestyle (I'd take a Chevy Colorado or a Toyota Tacoma), but I'd recommend it to anyone in the market for a big truck.


The thing is, this particular model is just a bit too much for my tastes. Tacky is one word for it. Take a look at the photos below. The buckles, the chrome, the gold accents and the tribal tattoo nonsense are way over the top. I want a truck, not a rolling testament to ranch farming Western wear. That said, I really like the leather and wood. Both look and feel really nice and liven up what's starting to become a dated design.

The basic things I like about the Ram are all here: The comfortable ride (made even better by the air suspension) good infotainment system and tons of pockets and cubbies. There's a nice slot for your phone with a cord pass-through that keeps it in place and out of the way. It's easy to drive and only feels really big when maneuvering through a tight parking lot. The current Ram is still really good, so I'm really looking forward to what's next.

  • Image Credit: Reese Counts
  • Image Credit: Reese Counts
  • Image Credit: Reese Counts
  • Image Credit: Reese Counts
  • Image Credit: Reese Counts
  • Image Credit: Reese Counts
  • Image Credit: Reese Counts


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