• Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
During the 1980s, every Accord that Honda could export to or build in the United States was snatched up immediately by eager customers. The third generation of Accord, built from the 1986 through 1989 model years, once roamed American roads in large numbers, but is now nearly extinct. Here is a low-mile (for an Accord) example spotted in a Denver self-service wrecking yard recently.



This car doesn't appear to have been stored for decades, so it must have been driven sparingly during its not-quite-150,000-mile total lifetime.



The LXi version came with a fuel-injected engine, alloy wheels (long gone from this car), a power moonroof, and these cool-looking emblems on the doors.



The 1,995cc straight-four engine in this car was rated at 110hp, same as the one in the Prelude Si that year, and made the LXi fairly quick (for the era).



This one has some rust, about as bad as what it would have had by about 1991 in New Hampshire.



The MSRP on the 1987 Accord LXi sedan was $14,429 (about $31,800 in inflation-adjusted 2017 dollars). The entry-level 1987 Accord DX hatchback was a mere $9,795. Meanwhile, the highest-zoot Ford Taurus that year, the LX sedan, listed at $14,613 and came with a 140-horse V6.



"You've always wished you could play like that."

It's... sophisticated. Honda... Accord.

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