• Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
  • Image Credit: Murilee Martin
Detroit muscle cars from the 1964-1972 period are much beloved today because of their absurd overkill in the horsepower, hood scoop, and wild-graphics departments. When enthusiasts begin restoring the trucks of the 1990s-2000s SUV craze, what criteria will they choose when deciding on the most iconic examples of the breed? Absurdity will be all-important, and for an SUV that boils down to one factor: size. That makes the Ford Excursion as significant as, say, the 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454, and with that in mind we have this week's Junkyard Gem: a first-year-of-production, nearly-four-ton Excursion XLT.



So hefty that it was exempt from fuel-economy ratings, the Excursion became a potent symbol of the Culture Wars, a defiant middle finger upraised in the faces of freedom-loathing nanny-staters who believed that natural resources might not be infinite.



This one has the extremely thirsty Triton V10, rated at 310 horsepower. Someone needs to rescue this engine and swap it into a Crown Victoria Police Interceptor!



The Excursion was so big that it was a headache to drive and park in the real world, and sales plummeted after a pretty good introductory year. After 2005, the Excursion was no more.



These trucks were great tow vehicles, though the F250 Super Duty pickup (which served as the basis for the Excursion) was a lot cheaper. Those who were serious about towing got the Powerstroke diesel engine instead of the V8 or V8 gasoline engines.



This one has some bits that Ford truck owners might want to grab, before the cold steel jaws of The Crusher bite down on this piece of American automotive history.

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