• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • With sleek coachwork by Scaglietti and mechanics engineered by Giotto Bizzarrini, the Ferrari 250 GTO was well positioned to dominate European racing, winning the FIA GT World Championship from 1962 to 1964. Despite the FIA's requirement that at least 100 cars of a given model be manufactured to qualify it as a "production" car for Grand Touring races, only 39 250 GTOs were ultimately made. Their combination of rarity, timeless design, and racing pedigree rank them among the most desirable automobiles of all time. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • With sleek coachwork by Scaglietti and mechanics engineered by Giotto Bizzarrini, the Ferrari 250 GTO was well positioned to dominate European racing, winning the FIA GT World Championship from 1962 to 1964. Despite the FIA's requirement that at least 100 cars of a given model be manufactured to qualify it as a "production" car for Grand Touring races, only 39 250 GTOs were ultimately made. Their combination of rarity, timeless design, and racing pedigree rank them among the most desirable automobiles of all time. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • With sleek coachwork by Scaglietti and mechanics engineered by Giotto Bizzarrini, the Ferrari 250 GTO was well positioned to dominate European racing, winning the FIA GT World Championship from 1962 to 1964. Despite the FIA's requirement that at least 100 cars of a given model be manufactured to qualify it as a "production" car for Grand Touring races, only 39 250 GTOs were ultimately made. Their combination of rarity, timeless design, and racing pedigree rank them among the most desirable automobiles of all time. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO
  • With sleek coachwork by Scaglietti and mechanics engineered by Giotto Bizzarrini, the Ferrari 250 GTO was well positioned to dominate European racing, winning the FIA GT World Championship from 1962 to 1964. Despite the FIA's requirement that at least 100 cars of a given model be manufactured to qualify it as a "production" car for Grand Touring races, only 39 250 GTOs were ultimately made. Their combination of rarity, timeless design, and racing pedigree rank them among the most desirable automobiles of all time. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1958 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
  • 1958 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
  • One of the most successful race cars built by Ferrari, the 250 TR, or Testa Rossa (Italian for "Red Head"), was named for the red valve covers on the engine and not the famous red body color now associated with Ferrari. The 1958 Testa Rossa received a powerful three-liter V12 engine, and upgrade from the two-liter, four-cylinder version of previous Testa Rossas. A Scuderia team car, this 250 TR debuted in Argentina at the 1000km Buenas Aires, where it was driven by Luigi Musso and legendary Belgian driver Olivier Gendebien. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1958 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
  • 1958 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
  • One of the most successful race cars built by Ferrari, the 250 TR, or Testa Rossa (Italian for "Red Head"), was named for the red valve covers on the engine and not the famous red body color now associated with Ferrari. The 1958 Testa Rossa received a powerful three-liter V12 engine, and upgrade from the two-liter, four-cylinder version of previous Testa Rossas. A Scuderia team car, this 250 TR debuted in Argentina at the 1000km Buenas Aires, where it was driven by Luigi Musso and legendary Belgian driver Olivier Gendebien. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1958 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
  • 1958 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa
  • One of the most successful race cars built by Ferrari, the 250 TR, or Testa Rossa (Italian for "Red Head"), was named for the red valve covers on the engine and not the famous red body color now associated with Ferrari. The 1958 Testa Rossa received a powerful three-liter V12 engine, and upgrade from the two-liter, four-cylinder version of previous Testa Rossas. A Scuderia team car, this 250 TR debuted in Argentina at the 1000km Buenas Aires, where it was driven by Luigi Musso and legendary Belgian driver Olivier Gendebien. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1965 Ferrari 250 LM
  • 1965 Ferrari 250 LM
  • The 250 LM (Le Mans) was designed by Pininfarina and introduced at the 1963 Paris Motor Show. It was Ferrari's first mid-engine V12 GT car. This 250 LM was imported to the United States by Luigi Chinetti, the legendary Ferrari dealer and founder of Ferrari's North American Racing Team (N.A.R.T.) in 1964. The following year, it was used by N.A.R.T. drivers Jochen Rindt and "Kansas City Flash" Masten Gregory to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the last of six consecutive outright Ferrari victories at Le Mans. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1965 Ferrari 250 LM
  • 1965 Ferrari 250 LM
  • The 250 LM (Le Mans) was designed by Pininfarina and introduced at the 1963 Paris Motor Show. It was Ferrari's first mid-engine V12 GT car. This 250 LM was imported to the United States by Luigi Chinetti, the legendary Ferrari dealer and founder of Ferrari's North American Racing Team (N.A.R.T.) in 1964. The following year, it was used by N.A.R.T. drivers Jochen Rindt and "Kansas City Flash" Masten Gregory to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the last of six consecutive outright Ferrari victories at Le Mans. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1965 Ferrari 250 LM
  • 1965 Ferrari 250 LM
  • The 250 LM (Le Mans) was designed by Pininfarina and introduced at the 1963 Paris Motor Show. It was Ferrari's first mid-engine V12 GT car. This 250 LM was imported to the United States by Luigi Chinetti, the legendary Ferrari dealer and founder of Ferrari's North American Racing Team (N.A.R.T.) in 1964. The following year, it was used by N.A.R.T. drivers Jochen Rindt and "Kansas City Flash" Masten Gregory to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the last of six consecutive outright Ferrari victories at Le Mans. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
2014 Ferrari LaFerrari
  • 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari
  • Introduced in 2013, the LaFerrari was Ferrari's first production car powered by a hybrid powertrain, combining a 161 horsepower electric motor with a poweful 6.3-liter V12 engine. The seats are integrated into the chassis rather than bolted on the platform, lowering overall weight and allowing for more intuitive handling. The 500th LaFerrari built became the most expensive new car sold in the 21st century when it was auctioned for $7 million in 2016. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
2014 Ferrari LaFerrari
  • 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari
  • Introduced in 2013, the LaFerrari was Ferrari's first production car powered by a hybrid powertrain, combining a 161 horsepower electric motor with a poweful 6.3-liter V12 engine. The seats are integrated into the chassis rather than bolted on the platform, lowering overall weight and allowing for more intuitive handling. The 500th LaFerrari built became the most expensive new car sold in the 21st century when it was auctioned for $7 million in 2016. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
2014 Ferrari LaFerrari
  • 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari
  • Introduced in 2013, the LaFerrari was Ferrari's first production car powered by a hybrid powertrain, combining a 161 horsepower electric motor with a poweful 6.3-liter V12 engine. The seats are integrated into the chassis rather than bolted on the platform, lowering overall weight and allowing for more intuitive handling. The 500th LaFerrari built became the most expensive new car sold in the 21st century when it was auctioned for $7 million in 2016. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum).
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1976 Ferrari 312 T2
  • 1976 Ferrari 312 T2
  • After revised aerodynamic rules for 1976 prohibited intakes placed behind the cockpit, Ferrari designed the 312 T2 with side-mounted air intakes, each of which channeled air into separate cylinder banks of its V12 engine. Driven by Niki Lauda, this T2 won both the Belgian and Monaco Grand Prix in 1976. A slightly more developed version of the T2 was campaigned in the 1977 season, during which it contributed to Ferrari earning its second and third consecutive Constructor's Championships. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1976 Ferrari 312 T2
  • 1976 Ferrari 312 T2
  • After revised aerodynamic rules for 1976 prohibited intakes placed behind the cockpit, Ferrari designed the 312 T2 with side-mounted air intakes, each of which channeled air into separate cylinder banks of its V12 engine. Driven by Niki Lauda, this T2 won both the Belgian and Monaco Grand Prix in 1976. A slightly more developed version of the T2 was campaigned in the 1977 season, during which it contributed to Ferrari earning its second and third consecutive Constructor's Championships. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1976 Ferrari 312 T2
  • 1976 Ferrari 312 T2
  • After revised aerodynamic rules for 1976 prohibited intakes placed behind the cockpit, Ferrari designed the 312 T2 with side-mounted air intakes, each of which channeled air into separate cylinder banks of its V12 engine. Driven by Niki Lauda, this T2 won both the Belgian and Monaco Grand Prix in 1976. A slightly more developed version of the T2 was campaigned in the 1977 season, during which it contributed to Ferrari earning its second and third consecutive Constructor's Championships. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
2006 Ferrari 248 F1
  • 2006 Ferrari 248 F1
  • In his last season, Michael Schumacher drove this 248 Formula One race car, which was designed by Aldo Costa and Rory Byrne, and named for its 2.4-liter, eight-cylinder engine. Schumacher retired from Formula One competition at the end of the 2006 season after a decade of racing for Scuderia Ferrari. The announcement came shortly after winning the 2006 Italian Grand Prix. The following season, Schumacher became and adviser to the Ferrari team, helping to prepare race cars and select drivers. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
2006 Ferrari 248 F1
  • 2006 Ferrari 248 F1
  • In his last season, Michael Schumacher drove this 248 Formula One race car, which was designed by Aldo Costa and Rory Byrne, and named for its 2.4-liter, eight-cylinder engine. Schumacher retired from Formula One competition at the end of the 2006 season after a decade of racing for Scuderia Ferrari. The announcement came shortly after winning the 2006 Italian Grand Prix. The following season, Schumacher became and adviser to the Ferrari team, helping to prepare race cars and select drivers. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
2006 Ferrari 248 F1
  • 2006 Ferrari 248 F1
  • In his last season, Michael Schumacher drove this 248 Formula One race car, which was designed by Aldo Costa and Rory Byrne, and named for its 2.4-liter, eight-cylinder engine. Schumacher retired from Formula One competition at the end of the 2006 season after a decade of racing for Scuderia Ferrari. The announcement came shortly after winning the 2006 Italian Grand Prix. The following season, Schumacher became and adviser to the Ferrari team, helping to prepare race cars and select drivers. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1947 Ferrari 125 S
  • 1947 Ferrari 125 S
  • After World War II, Enzo Ferrari rebuilt his Maranello workshop, which had been leveled by Allied bombs. Because obtaining financing was so difficult at the time, he was forced to sell personal items to fund the production of the first car to bear his name. Dubbed the 125 S, it was also the first vehicle he equipped the now-legendary Ferrari V12 engine. It did not finish the 1947 Piacenza Circuit race, its first ever, but Enzo Ferrari was undaunted and went on to claim victory at the Terme di Caracella circuit in Rome soon thereafter. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1947 Ferrari 125 S
  • 1947 Ferrari 125 S
  • After World War II, Enzo Ferrari rebuilt his Maranello workshop, which had been leveled by Allied bombs. Because obtaining financing was so difficult at the time, he was forced to sell personal items to fund the production of the first car to bear his name. Dubbed the 125 S, it was also the first vehicle he equipped the now-legendary Ferrari V12 engine. It did not finish the 1947 Piacenza Circuit race, its first ever, but Enzo Ferrari was undaunted and went on to claim victory at the Terme di Caracella circuit in Rome soon thereafter. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1949 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta
  • 1949 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta
  • The 166 MM features an overhead cam V12 engine similar to those of its predecessors, but weighed substantially less thanks to its superleggera ("superlight") body by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan. The compact, streamlined coachwork was described by a journalist as a barchetta ("little boat"), a term now used for any open Italian two-seater. the "MM" in the model designation stands for Mille Miglia, an iconic Italian long-distance race won by this car in 1949. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1949 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta
  • 1949 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta
  • The 166 MM features an overhead cam V12 engine similar to those of its predecessors, but weighed substantially less thanks to its superleggera ("superlight") body by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan. The compact, streamlined coachwork was described by a journalist as a barchetta ("little boat"), a term now used for any open Italian two-seater. the "MM" in the model designation stands for Mille Miglia, an iconic Italian long-distance race won by this car in 1949. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1949 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta
  • 1949 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta
  • The 166 MM features an overhead cam V12 engine similar to those of its predecessors, but weighed substantially less thanks to its superleggera ("superlight") body by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan. The compact, streamlined coachwork was described by a journalist as a barchetta ("little boat"), a term now used for any open Italian two-seater. the "MM" in the model designation stands for Mille Miglia, an iconic Italian long-distance race won by this car in 1949. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1955 Ferrari 857 Sport
  • 1955 Ferrari 857 Sport
  • By 1955 Ferrari was an established and respected manufacturer focused on innovation, but a defeat by the Mercedes-Benz team at the World Sportscar Championship that year prompted the firm to experiment with more radical engine and body designs. One such vehicle, this 857 Sport is part of the Monza series that featured a new twin-cam, four-cylinder engine and a lightweight aluminum body by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. It was exported directly from the factory to the Los Angeles suburb of Sherman Oaks in 1956, and, of the four built, is the only one with a rear fin. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1955 Ferrari 857 Sport
  • 1955 Ferrari 857 Sport
  • By 1955 Ferrari was an established and respected manufacturer focused on innovation, but a defeat by the Mercedes-Benz team at the World Sportscar Championship that year prompted the firm to experiment with more radical engine and body designs. One such vehicle, this 857 Sport is part of the Monza series that featured a new twin-cam, four-cylinder engine and a lightweight aluminum body by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. It was exported directly from the factory to the Los Angeles suburb of Sherman Oaks in 1956, and, of the four built, is the only one with a rear fin. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1955 Ferrari 857 Sport
  • 1955 Ferrari 857 Sport
  • By 1955 Ferrari was an established and respected manufacturer focused on innovation, but a defeat by the Mercedes-Benz team at the World Sportscar Championship that year prompted the firm to experiment with more radical engine and body designs. One such vehicle, this 857 Sport is part of the Monza series that featured a new twin-cam, four-cylinder engine and a lightweight aluminum body by Carrozzeria Scaglietti. It was exported directly from the factory to the Los Angeles suburb of Sherman Oaks in 1956, and, of the four built, is the only one with a rear fin. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder SWB
  • 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder SWB
  • The 250 California was first proposed to Luigi Chinetti in 1957 by John von Neumann, Ferrari's West Coast representative, who believed that there was a ready market for a chic, expensive convertible in the United States. Chinetti convinced Enzo Ferrari to produce the car, which was designed by Pininfarina and constructed by Scaglietti. The California was offered in either Long Wheelbase (LWB) or Short Wheelbase (SWB). The reduced length of the SWB models provided for more nimble handling, better acceleration, and gave it a more purposeful stance. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder SWB
  • 1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder SWB
  • The 250 California was first proposed to Luigi Chinetti in 1957 by John von Neumann, Ferrari's West Coast representative, who believed that there was a ready market for a chic, expensive convertible in the United States. Chinetti convinced Enzo Ferrari to produce the car, which was designed by Pininfarina and constructed by Scaglietti. The California was offered in either Long Wheelbase (LWB) or Short Wheelbase (SWB). The reduced length of the SWB models provided for more nimble handling, better acceleration, and gave it a more purposeful stance. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder (SWB)
  • 1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder (SWB)
  • The 250 California was first proposed to Luigi Chinetti in 1957 by John von Neumann, Ferrari's West Coast representative, who believed that there was a ready market for a chic, expensive convertible in the United States. Chinetti convinced Enzo Ferrari to produce the car, which was designed by Pininfarina and constructed by Scaglietti. The California was offered in either Long Wheelbase (LWB) or Short Wheelbase (SWB). The reduced length of the SWB models provided for more nimble handling, better acceleration, and gave it a more purposeful stance. (text courtesy of the Petersen Museum)
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
When the Petersen Automotive Museum completed its extensive 14-month renovation and reopened its doors in December of 2015, automotive enthusiasts were treated to a refreshed 95,000 square feet of exhibit space boasting 25 separate galleries. At the time of opening our favorite of those was the Precious Metal exhibit in the Bruce Meyer Family Gallery, featuring some of the world's most desirable cars all painted in silver.

While we're sad the Precious Metal exhibit is no more, the gallery is now filled with something perhaps even better - an exhibit celebrating the 70th anniversary of Ferrari called "Seeing Red". The theme of a single color has been maintained (red, of course), and the gallery features eleven of the most significant road and race cars built by the Prancing Horse in the last seven decades.

Leading the herd is a stunning 1963 Ferrari 250 GTO, one of just 39 built and widely considered to be one of if not the most desirable collector car in the world. The last one that sold at auction brought a record $38 million. Following up the 250 GTO is an achingly gorgeous 1958 250 Testa Rossa and then a 1965 250 LM that won Le Mans outright in 1965. A Mille Miglia winner, a 1949 166 MM Barchetta, is also on display.

Perhaps the most historically significant car in the collection, however, is a 1947 Ferrari 125 S. Although this particular vehicle's history is difficult to trace, with many early race cars being wrecked, cut up, or combined with other cars, many believe this example, chassis 010I, to be the very first car to carry the Ferrari badge. Not surprisingly, the 125 S was a successful race car, winning six of the thirteen races in which it competed.

Petersen Ferrari 70th Anniversary ExhibitPetersen Ferrari 70th Anniversary ExhibitPetersen Ferrari 70th Anniversary ExhibitPetersen Ferrari 70th Anniversary Exhibit

The rest of the gallery is a celebration of belle macchine, which includes a 1955 Ferrari 857 Sport, a 1958 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder SWB, Michael Schumacher's 2006 Ferrari 248 F1, a 1976 Ferrari 312 T2 driven by Niki Lauda to victory at the Monaco Grand Prix, and a 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari.

"We're so thrilled to bring some of the world's most beautiful Ferraris to the Petersen," said Bruce Meyer, founding chairman of the Petersen's Board of Directors. "Seeing that Rosso Corsa paint and the beautiful curves of the body work is always enough to make your heart skip a beat. 'Seeing Red' will be one of the most significant gatherings of Ferraris in the world and I'm so pleased to be able to share it with the public in our gallery."

"This new exhibit is another example of how the Petersen views cars, as art, and nothing is more appropriate than red Ferrari models," said Terry Karges, Executive Director of the Petersen Automotive Museum. "We're confident this exhibit will helps us continue our success and really get people talking and learning about Ferrari."

The Seeing Red: 70 Years of Ferrari exhibit at the Petersen is scheduled to run through April of 2018. For more details on visiting the museum visit www.petersen.org or call 323-930-CARS

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