If you want a good sound system, you need a good set of speakers. Speakers are basically air pistons that move back and forth creating different sound frequencies. Alternating current is fed to the speaker voice coil by an external amplifier. The voice coil acts an electromagnet that interacts with a fixed magnet at the bottom of the speaker. Since the voice coil is attached to the speaker cone, this magnetic interaction causes the cone to move back and forth.

When the speaker cone is punctured, the speaker no longer functions as designed. Speaker cone damage is usually the result of impact from a foreign object. Discovering that your favorite speakers have a hole can be very discouraging, but never fear, there is a fix!

Part 1 of 1: Repair the speaker

Materials Needed

  • Coffee filter
  • Glue (Elmer’s and Gorilla Glue)
  • Paint brush
  • Plate
  • Scissors

Step 1: Mix the glue. Pour the glue onto a plate, mixing one part glue to three parts water.

Step 2: Fill the crack with glue. Use a paintbrush to apply the glue and fill the crack.

Do this to both the front and backside of the speaker, letting the glue dry thoroughly. Keep applying coats of glue until the crack is completely filled.

Step 3: Add coffee filter paper to the crack. Tear a piece of coffee paper that is about a half inch larger than the crack.

Place it over the crack and use your paintbrush to apply a coat of glue, allowing the glue to dry.

  • Note: If you are repairing a high wattage application such as a subwoofer, you may want to add a second layer of coffee filter paper.

Step 4: Paint the speaker. Apply a thin layer of paint to the speaker or add color with a permanent marker.

That’s it! Instead of spending money on a new speaker, you were able to fix the old one with common household items. Now it’s time to celebrate by hooking up the speaker and cranking the tunes. If patching up your speakers didn’t cure your stereo system woes, give the team at YourMechanic a call to perform an inspection. We offer expert stereo repair at a price you can afford.

This article originally appeared on YourMechanic.com as How to Replace a Hole in a Speaker and was authored by Mia Bevacqua.


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