• Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
In order for automakers to meet increasingly stringent emissions standards around the world, electric-vehicle adoption will need to climb to levels that would even make the denizens of Portland, Brooklyn, San Francisco, or any other green-minded locale jealous. According to a report that the World Energy Council produced with Accenture Strategy, the global market share of EVs will need to jump by 16 percent by the end of the decade. The study is being presented at the G20 Energy Ministers meeting in Beijing this week. We're guessing it may be met with some skepticism, too.

Annual electric-vehicle sales in the US will need to jump by about 900,000 units by 2020, according to the report. In Europe, annual EV sales will need to surge by 1.4 million units. And in China? Car-buyers will need to buy about 5.3 million more electric vehicles each year than they do now.

The report reflects how automakers appear to be falling behind the pace needed to meet greenhouse-gas-emissions standards that the European Union, the US, and China have set for the next few years. Taken together, the standards indicate that fleet widefuel economy will need to jump about 30 percent between 2014 and 2020. That means that, within a global annual sales rate of about 40 million light-duty vehicles, annual sales of EVs will need to surge by more than 7 million. Yes, that's an awful high bar to set for the Chevrolet Bolt, Tesla Model 3, or any model made by China-based electric-vehicle maker BYD.

To put those numbers into perspective, US plug-in vehicle sales (including plug-in hybrids) through May were up about 7 percent from a year earlier to about 43,000 units, which is a veritable drop in the bucket compared to the numbers in the World Energy Council Report. June's US green-car sales figures will come out Friday.

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