• Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
  • Image Credit: Barrett-Jackson
This is 2004 Ford GT CP-1. Short for "confirmation prototype one" and wearing VIN 004, it's the very first fully functional version of the last-generation GT. And you have a chance to buy it. CP-1 is going up for auction at Barrett-Jackson's Northeast auction on June 25.

According to the auction description, CP-1 has spent the last several years living in Ford's museum. It has a fully functional drivetrain and a finished interior, and even wears the autographs of Carroll Shelby, Bill Ford, and the GT's chief designer and chief design engineers. But all that cool stuff also obscures some... oddities. The steering column? The GT team borrowed one from the humble Ford Windstar minivan. CP-1 is also home to some one-off design features that never made it to the production GT.

The headliner is aluminum and lacks the upholstered, sound-deadening finish of the production car, and the rear clamshell is a carbon-fiber piece that Ford execs nixed when they found out each unit would cost $45,000. Even the engine is different – the supercharger and valve covers are both black, rather than the silver and Ford Blue of the production GT. Elements of the development process remain, too, including an emissions-testing "sniffer pipe" on the exhaust.

This GT is extremely cool. But it's also completely undrivable. Before selling CP-1 to a prominent collector in 2008, Ford installed a chip that limits the top speed to just five miles per hour. Barrett-Jackson will auction this 550-horsepower, 5 mph statue on Saturday, with a reserve. It's lot number 654.

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