Hawaii, like other states, has regulations in place for seat belts, and other security. Adults are expected to use their seat belts, and they are also expected to look after children who occupy their motor vehicles. Children cannot be expected to understand safety laws, so it is up to the adult in the car to make sure that the laws are understood, and obeyed.

In Hawaii, it is the law that any child who is under age four has to ride in a safety seat, and any child up to age seven has to ride in a booster seat.

Summary of child safety seat laws in Hawaii

As stated, under four means a safety seat, and up to seven means a booster seat. There are other laws, too. The child safety seat laws in Hawaii can be summarized as follows:

  • Children must be kept in rear-facing seats until they are two years old.

  • Children ages four to seven must ride in a safety seat or booster seat.

  • Booster seats must be used until shoulder and lap belts fit properly.

  • Children up to 1 year old and 20 pounds or less must use rear-facing child seats.

  • Children that outgrow rear-facing seats can use forward facing seats.

  • Children that are between the ages of four and seven years must use booster seats until ordinary seat belts fit effectively.

Penalties

If you violate the child seat safety laws in Hawaii, then you can expect to be assessed a $100 fine. Of course you want to keep your kids safe in the first place, so if you just obey the laws, then you won’t have to worry about incurring a fine. The laws are there to keep you and your children safe.

This article originally appeared on YourMechanic.com as Child Seat Safety Laws in Hawaii and was authored by Valerie Johnston.


Share This Photo X