The lubrication that the oil in your engine offers is important in maintaining the car’s functionality. A variety of parts go into ensuring that the oil supply in a car stays at peak levels. Making sure that the pressure level of the oil is right is the job of the oil pressure sensor. The oil pressure sensor helps to send the information regarding the oil pressure to the gauge that is located on the instrument cluster. In order to keep a car running smoothly, you will have to be alerted when there is a problem with the oil pressure. By having a fully functional pressure sensor, you will be able to get this information easily.

Like all of the other sensors and switches on a car, the oil pressure sensor is built to last just as long as the car does. Generally, this will not be the case due to the wear and harsh conditions that the sensor is exposed to, it will usually become damaged and will have to be replaced. Neglecting to get this sensor replaced when the time comes can lead to a variety of different issues. Running a car with low oil level will cause damage to the internal parts of the engine. In order to reduce the type of damage, you will have to act quickly as soon as you discover issues with this sensor.

For the most part, you will not give your oil pressure sensor any thought until there are repair issues. The location and important role that this part plays in your engine is a big reason why allowing a professional to replace the oil pressure sensor would be a good idea.

Here are some of the things that you will notice when your oil pressure sensor is going out:

  • The Oil Pressure light is on
  • The oil pressure gauge is erratic
  • The Check Engine light is on

As soon as you begin to notice that these symptoms are showing up, you will have to take the time to get the appropriate repairs. The faster you are able to get the right repairs done to your car, the easier you will find it to get your car back in good working order.

This article originally appeared on YourMechanic.com as How Long Does an Oil Pressure Sensor Last? and was authored by Valerie Johnston.


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