The right amount of air and fuel in your engine is a vital component in keeping the engine running as it should. Making sure that all of the vital components of the air and fuel system are running at peak condition is the best way to keep a car running at peak condition. The mass airflow sensor records the amount of air that is coming into the engine and will then calculate how much fuel is needed to offset it. Without a properly working mass airflow sensor, it will be nearly impossible to keep your car running as intended.

There are a number of things that can prohibit a mass air flow from working. Generally, this type of sensor is supposed to last as long as the car does, but this will usually not happen. Over the years, a lot of carbon will get built up on the mass airflow sensor and make it very hard for air to pass through as intended. This reduction in air flow will only lead to issues with the vehicle not working properly. Addressing the issues with the mass air flow sensor in a hurry will reduce the amount of trouble that you have and can also reduce the damage that is done to the vehicle.

Due to the level of complexity that changing out this part can present, it is best if you let a professional handle this work for you. They will be able to diagnose the problems that you are having and make sure that the right part gets replaced. Trying to do this type of troubleshooting on your own will usually lead to less than desirable results.

When your mass air flow sensor is going bad, here are some of the things that you may notice:

  • The car does not have the power that it once did
  • There is an excessive amount of fuel being used
  • The car will not start due to carbon clogging the sensor
  • The Check Engine Light is on

Taking these signs seriously and getting the right repairs performed will help to restore the performance that your car has lost. Having professionals perform this type of repair is the best way to get the right results.

This article originally appeared on YourMechanic.com as How Long Does a Mass Airflow Sensor Last? and was authored by Valerie Johnston.


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