The spoiler is located on the back of a vehicle and is intended to stop turbulence or drag that is created behind the vehicle. Spoilers are on every day cars as well as on high performance racing cars. In this article, we will be referring to passenger vehicle spoilers.

Purpose of a Spoiler

The main purpose of spoilers is to increase the car’s grip on the road. If the car did not have a spoiler, the vehicle would have to be heavier or the material in the tire would have to be changed. Therefore, by having a spoiler, the vehicle will be lighter and easier to drive.

Car Spoiler Material Types

Spoilers are most commonly made out of ABS plastic, which is mixed with granular fillers to make the spoiler stiffer. Fiberglass is another material spoilers are made out of and are set with epoxy. Fiberglass is durable, but does not work for large scale production because of the time involved in making it. A third type of material is silicon and it has high thermal characteristics as well as being durable. Carbon fiber is the last type of material car spoilers are made out of. Carbon fiber is lightweight, but is also expensive because it requires lots of manual labor.

Benefits of a Spoiler

A car spoiler will help to maintain traction at high speeds, generally over 70 mph. Spoilers increase fuel efficiency while reducing the overall weight of the vehicle. Furthermore, it adds visibly so the car is easier to be seen on the road and it also creates an eye catching design.

Types of Spoilers

There is four main types of car spoilers. The first is a pedestal spoiler which is the most common type. The front spoiler is the second type, and is created to lessen the drag which can be created by rear spoilers. A third type of spoiler is a lip spoiler, which are commonly used for aesthetic purposes. The last type of spoiler is called wings. These are seen mostly on race cars.

Spoilers do not come on all vehicles, but they do have a purpose on the cars they are on. Spoilers lessen the drag, allowing the vehicle to move more easily.

This article originally appeared on YourMechanic.com as 4 Essential Things to Know About Your Car’s Spoiler and was authored by Valerie Johnston.


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