ETC
1989 Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani front 3/4
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
1989 Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani nose
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
1989 Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani front
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
1989 Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani rear 3/4
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani rear 3/4
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani rear
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
1989 Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani rear
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani tail
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani interior
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani dashboard wheel
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani speedometer
  • Image Credit: Purosangue Maranello
Everyone knows that Ferraris are designed to go fast, but their performance is measured by a number of different metrics. This particular example, however, was designed with one goal in mind, and that was top speed. And now it's up for sale.

The one-of-a-kind creation was the work of Professor Luigi Colani. The car started life as a Testarossa, but was extensively modified and entirely rebodied in order to pursue a high-speed run at the Bonneville Salt Flats. That meant an aerodynamically optimized body designed by Colani to dramatic and wind-cheating effect, and substantially reworked mechanicals as well. The flat-twelve engine was fitted by German firm Lotec with a pair of turbochargers to drive output beyond 750 horsepower.

The 1989 Ferrari Testa D'Oro Colani - so named, we gather, for its gold cam cover - was clocked at 218 miles per hour back in 1991, winning its class at Bonneville and far outstripping the 201-mph top speed quoted by Ferrari for the F40 that was all the rage at the time.

The vehicle has now been put up for sale by Purosangue Maranello, where (as you can see from the images in the gallery above) it sits alongside another one-off Ferrari: the four-door Pinin concept of 1980 (to say nothing of the Minardi F1 racer in the other corner). If it's a completely unique Prancing Horse you're after, Purosangue (Italian for "pure blood" or "thoroughbred") seems to be the place to look.


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