2015 Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack
  • Image Credit: AOL

2015 Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack Super Bee Logo | Autoblog Short Cuts

  • The 2015 Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack includes a few homages to the Super Bee, including a startup animation and Super Bee emblems stitched into the seats.
  • Video Credit: AOL On
  •   Engine
    6.4L V8
  •   Power
    485 HP / 475 LB-FT
  •   Transmission
    8-Speed Automatic
  •   0-60 Time
    4.5 Seconds
  •   Top Speed
    175 MPH
  •   Drivetrain
    Rear-Wheel Drive
  •   Engine Placement
    Front
  •   Curb Weight
    4,400 LBS
  •   Seating
    2+3
  •   Cargo
    16.5 CU-FT
  •   MPG
    15 City / 25 HWY
  •   Base Price
    $28,990
  •   As Tested Price
    $41,685
  •  
"Scat Pack" is plucked from The Big Book of Dodge Nameplates to describe what is basically the average of the Charger R/T and Charger SRT 392. Unnecessary horsepower always seems to go down better with a dose of heritage.

If you think it's a silly name, just be thankful Dodge didn't call it an S/RT or an R/T-S. In previous years, a similar formulation was known as the SRT8 Super Bee. Going by another name, it's still as sweet and wears the same hurried-looking pollinator on the grille. We do wonder: What has displeased him so, and why does he have wings and wheels?

The packaging is at least fresh. All Chargers get updates for 2015, including improved interiors and a Dart-on-steroids exterior redo. The new lines work especially well on the more aggressive models, including this Scat Pack car. Like the Super Bee before it, the Scat Pack gets the 6.4-liter engine from SRT 392; for 2015 it gets a slight output boost to 485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque, respective increases of 15 and 5. It does without the SRT three-mode suspension and comes with cloth seats (leather is an option) to keep the price down. The Scat Pack also has slightly smaller Brembo front brakes, narrower wheels, and different rubber.

It does, however, cost eight grand less and is just as quick in a straight line. Intriguing.

Driving Notes

  • Scat Pack cars get an electronically controlled active exhaust that we'd call hyperactive. It's loud all the time, opening its widest at startup, idle, and when you ask for any appreciable amount of power. Sport mode supposedly makes a difference, but we couldn't discern loud from louder. It's a delicious and appropriate loudness, with a brassy trumpet tone to it, and the engine makes top-fuel noises at full tilt.
  • The squeal of the rear tires can be heard from every stoplight no matter the road conditions. A light touch avoids leaving a mark if you're so inclined. We weren't.
  • When the tires eventually smear into the realm of traction, this thing is pretty quick – hitting 60 miles per hour takes 4.5 seconds. There's also an adjustable launch control mode if you want to cut out some of the wheelspin.
  • The eight-speed transmission shifts smoothly. Quicker, more-palpable shifts are had in Sport mode, but occasionally the transmission still needs a moment to drop down from seventh or eighth when you mash the throttle.
  • Despite its two overdrive gears, this Charger is still loud on the highway. In a good way. Probably. We could see it getting tiresome on a long trip.
  • Following the theme, the ride is on the noisy side, but still comfortable. Nothing masks the car's size.
  • The traction compromise and a liberally programmed stability system let you steer with your right foot; the actual steering is low on feedback but offers a choice of three weight settings.
  • Both the default driving mode and selectable Sport mode are customizable, giving the driver what amounts to two programmable presets for steering, engine/trans, traction control, and the shift paddles. This also lets you make the sportier settings the default, which is kind of nice, but most will want to mix and match.
  • Chrysler fixed the shifter for 2015. Finally. The yacht throttle dealie has been replaced by a pistol-grip lever, complete with detents that actually give you an idea of which gear you've selected.
  • The supportive, sporty (supporty?) seats are comfy enough, but the standard cloth covering comes with slightly cheesy embroidered bees on the front buckets. The rest of the interior is on the drab side, although the 2015 improvements are a noticeable upgrade in materials and design.
  • Despite frequent and enthusiastic throttle applications, we saw an average of 20 miles per gallon, which beats the EPA combined number. There's no cylinder deactivation here like on the 5.7-liter R/T, but having eight gears helps.
  • B5 Blue is just a neat color. So neat that it warrants its own, final bullet point.

There is no stealth mode with the Scat Pack. You can't turn off its sound or tone down the ride. A lot of this package is just cost savings compared to the SRT 392, but the upshot is an always-on, entertaining personality. A Chevy SS is about the same money (and available with a manual), but that car looks, sounds, and feels tame by comparison. The thrill of the Scat Pack is that it's fun everywhere, with every prod of the gas, and doesn't need good roads or space to uncork its charms.

Again, this is not a new idea. A new level of polish and a coat of nostalgic details make the best argument yet for a big engine in a simple package. It's the kind of recycling even lovers of thumpy muscle sedans can get behind.


Related Video:

2015 Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack Super Bee Logo | Autoblog Short Cuts

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