• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
The Aston Martin DBX was a revelation when it debuted at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show. Not only did the concept evolve the British brand's traditional shape into a high-riding crossover coupe, there were electric motors to power each wheel. Just a few weeks ago, we learned that the company secured $306 million in funding to actually bring the DBX to production. Now, CEO Andy Palmer is talking about just how important the model is for the future.

With the DBX moving into such a radically different segment than the rest of the lineup, the model gives Aston Martin the opportunity to go after a new group of customers. "You can't create enough working capital with just 7,000 cars a year whichever way you look at it. You've got to extend the portfolio somewhere, and I'd rather do this than sell caps and t-shirts," Palmer said to Auto Express, taking a slight dig at Ferrari.

While Aston calls the DBX a crossover, its coupe-like lines don't look like any other vehicle in the segment, especially other high-style CUV attempts like the BMW X6 and Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class Coupe. Apparently, that differentiation is entirely on purpose. "We think there is a different space to the traditional SUV. Why? Because we make beautiful cars, and it's hard to make a beautiful SUV. It's hard to make a box beautiful," Palmer said to Auto Express.

The production DBX will gain two more doors for the start of production in 2019, according to Auto Express. The high-performance electric powertrain will remain, though, and Aston will aim for a range of over 300 miles. Earlier reports also suggested that the CUV could be produced at a new factory in the US.

Aston Martin isn't abandoning its performance legacy entirely, though. The DBX is just one part of Palmer's Second Century plan, and the other major pillar is replacing every model in the brand's lineup by the end of the decade. One of them has already been spotted testing.

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