• Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
  • Image Credit: National Corvette Museum
UPDATE: The Thunderdome at the National Corvette Museum is not a ride; instead it's an experience that mixes digital graphics and thundering sound.

For a brief period, it looked like the National Corvette Museum was going to preserve that sinkhole that ate eight important 'Vettes last year. After all, tourism boomed there afterwards. However, keeping the crater would have been more expensive than just doing the repairs. The museum isn't ready to let people completely forget, though, and now intends to make a major attraction out of a recreated version of the calamity.

The museum's plan turns the sinkhole disaster into an amusement park ride called the Thunderdome, according to GM Authority. In a smaller recreation of the Skydome, 15 people at a time would get to watch an imitation of the sinkhole devouring the eight Corvettes. To make the experience even more immersive, visitors would get to view this all from an artificial, underground cave.

If you missed seeing the actual pit, this would certainly be a bizarre way to experience it. According to GM Authority, the exhibit would also include an explanation of how sinkholes occur. The Corvette museum reportedly wants the attraction open by this fall.

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