Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
  • Ford Michigan Assembly Plant
Ford Focus Electric Range
  • Ford Focus Electric Range
Ford Focus Electric Range
  • Ford Focus Electric Range
The US Energy Information Administration has adjusted its ethanol production forecasts. It predicts an average of 944,000 barrels per day for 2015. That number is up from 2014 production levels of 935,000 barrels per day, but it is lower than last month's projection for 2015, which was 947,000 barrels per day. The EIA forecasts 937,000 barrels per day in 2016, down from its prior forecast of 942,000 barrels. Biodiesel production averaged 83,000 barrels per day last year, with projections of 82,000 for 2015, and 84,000 for 2016. Read more from Ethanol Producer Magazine.

Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh supports the proposed Diesel and Vehicular Emissions Ordinance. The ordinance, filed by City Councilor Stephen Murphy, would require emissions control retrofitting of all pre-2007 vehicles belonging to the City of Boston, as well as those of any contractors it hires. The ordinance also seeks to create a simple city-level standard of enforcing the state's anti-idling laws. "The asthma rate in Boston's neighborhoods continues to climb," says Councilor Murphy. "By further tightening air quality standards, as this ordinance does, we will make Boston's neighborhoods healthier." Read more at DieselNet.

The Michigan Blue Economy report profiles Ford for its water-saving sustainability efforts. The report notes that Ford reduced its water use by 61 percent, or 10 billion gallons, from 2000 to 2013 by "cutting the water used in everything from cooling towers to paint operations." As part of its Global Water Management Initiative, Ford has decreased its total water use at its facilities worldwide from 64 million cubic meters per year to 25 million cubic meters. Read more from Ford, or at the Michigan Blue Economy website.

The EPA has named Nissan an Energy Star Partner of the Year for the fourth year in a row. The automaker received the Sustained Excellence Award for its efforts to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in its operations. Nissan reduced the amount of energy used to build vehicles by 13 percent in 2014. Energy reduction efforts include switching to LED lighting and developing an environmentally friendly paint process. Nissan also works with schools in Tennessee and Mississippi to help them reduce energy usage. "Since this initiative began in 2012, we've helped about 30 schools make the esteemed Energy Star certification list," says Nissan's John Martin. Read more in the press release below.

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Nissan receives 2015 ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Award for fourth year in a row

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Nissan once again received the ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year – Sustained Excellence Award, the highest honor given to top organizations dedicated to protecting the environment by making their operations more energy efficient.

This marks the fourth consecutive year that Nissan has been recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency for its continued commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving energy management.

"Since Nissan became an ENERGY STAR partner in 2006, we have made continual improvements to our operations, which has helped us reduce both our environmental footprint and manufacturing costs," said John Martin, senior vice president, Manufacturing, Supply Chain Management and Purchasing. "In 2014, those improvements reduced the amount of energy required to build vehicles by 13 percent-that's the same amount of energy it would take to power more than 5,400 homes for an entire year."

Nissan's efforts to reduce energy usage include switching to more efficient LED lighting, repairing compressed air leaks and using an environmentally friendly paint process that has cut energy usage by 30 percent.

"Our commitment to the environment doesn't stop with changes to our own operations, but we also go out in the community to help others identify ways to save energy," said Martin. "We work with schools in middle Tennessee and central Mississippi to help them reach their energy savings goals. Since this initiative began in 2012, we've helped about 30 schools make the esteemed ENERGY STAR certification list."

Nissan manufacturing operations in the U.S. include the Nissan Vehicle Assembly Plant in Smyrna, Tennessee, which produced more vehicles than any other automotive plant in North America in 2014. This facility and Nissan's plant in Canton, Mississippi, also were recently awarded the ENERGY STAR Certification for the ninth year in a row, signifying Nissan's spot among the top 25 percent of the automotive manufacturing industry for superior energy management.

The prestigious 2015 Partner of the Year – Sustained Excellence Awards are given to organizations to recognize their commitment to becoming more energy efficient. Nissan's work with the ENERGY STAR program aligns with the company's sustainability strategy, the Nissan Green Program, and its efforts to reduce its carbon footprint by 20 percent by 2016. Nissan's accomplishments will be recognized at an event in Washington, D.C., on April 20.

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