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There have been some big shakeups within Nissan's top executive ranks in the past 12 months, including Johan de Nyscchen leaving Infiniti to run Cadillac and Andy Palmer taking over Aston Martin. With them gone, the automaker's future product portfolio looks to be shifting as well. Among them, the chances are dwindling for the BladeGlider to actually arrive in dealersalready a rumored possibility.

New Nissan planning boss Philippe Klein isn't nearly as hot on the idea of the BladeGlider as his predecessors. Where Palmer said last year the vehicle was in the brand's mid-term plan, Klein recently told Autocar that the model was "not among the immediate priorities." He didn't slam the door entirely on potential production, though. "It is still on the table, but at the end of the day it has to make sense to the company."

Debuting at the 2013 Tokyo Motor Show, the BladeGlider translated the narrow-front, wide-rear wedge shape of the Deltawing and ZEOD RC racers to the street. In concept form, it used an electric drivetrain with hub-mounted motors, and the driver sat in the center with two passengers flanking them to the rear. According to Autocar, the project to develop a production version got at least as far as creating test cars from Ariel Atoms.

The BladeGlider's renegade styling hasn't been the only thing holding it back from seeing the road, though. Panoz has a pending lawsuit against Nissan that claims the styling for the Nissan ZEOD RC and the BladeGlider infringe on the intellectual property for the Deltawing's design.

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