• Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
  • Image Credit: Sebastian Blanco
"This is, without a question of a doubt, the most advanced vehicle on the planet. It's as revolutionary as the Model T was when it came out."

That is exceptionally high praise, and it's not even being heaped on one of the million-dollar hybrid hypercars from Ferrari or McLaren. It's not even being attributed to a particularly zealous Tesla fan. Nope, it's coming from a mustachioed man in suburban Detroit, and he's discussing a $42,400 BMW hatchback with Forbes.

Of course, said hatchback is the revolutionary i3, and Sandy Munro's statements carry some degree of authority, as his company is tearing apart and analyzing every little nut, washer and bolt on the four-seat EV. Munro's eponymous company performs reverse-engineering analysis, meaning they rip apart brand new cars and sell the information to the world's automakers, saving OEM's both time and money. The most interesting thing it has discovered thus far? That even with the high costs of two of the i3's most important elements – carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic and lithium-ion batteries – his company's analysis shows that BMW need only sell about 20,000 units a year to turn a profit, Forbes reports.

While Munro's company is often contracted by automakers, he's gone it alone on the i3 project, dropping about $1 million into in-depth analysis. That's a lot of money, but the company should be able to turn around and sell its findings for about $500,000, with a batch of Chinese automakers already queued up and ready to buy. Analysis of individual i3 components will also be available from a sort of à la carte menu.

To see what it is about the i3 that has Munro speaking so highly of it, head over to the Forbes website and check out the feature article and video on the reverse-engineering process.

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