• Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Polaris
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
You can add one more state to the places where you can't register the three-wheeled Polaris Slingshot for the road. Connecticut had already decided that the trike didn't fit its definition of a motorcycle, but the company tried again anyway by taking one directly to the DMV headquarters there. The government officials took a look and came away with the same ruling on the vehicle – it's just not a cycle by their criteria.

The local Republican-American newspaper published a portion of a letter from the DMV's senior attorney to Polaris explaining the problem. "It is the consensus of the DMV that this vehicle closely resembles an automobile in appearance, and is equipped (brake, clutch, accelerator, steering wheel, four-cylinder engine, seat belt, gear shifter, etc.) and handles like an automobile rather than a motorcycle," it said. Furthermore, Connecticut's definition of a bike prevents the partially enclosed driver's seat featured in the Slingshot.

The company's next option is to work with the state legislature to carve out a designation for the Slingshot and, according to the DMV attorney's letter, also for "similar vehicles that are also attempting to enter the market in Connecticut." That might include other enclosed trikes like the Morgan Three-Wheeler.

Making that change in definition happen might not be a huge burden, though. "I don't think this will be a problem. We have the backing of several senators and several representatives. It might take a little time, but it will come about," said Damon Libby, owner of a Connecticut Polaris dealer, to the Republican-American.

According to a Polaris press release posted on Slingshot Forums, the company is still working with Connecticut, Hawaii, Indiana and Maryland to get the trikes classified in the US. However, this announcement says that the earlier problem in Texas is now largely resolved with just the matter of how to title it. Previously, the Lone Star State said a motorcycle must have a saddle-type seat arrangement, not chairs like the Slingshot.

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