• Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
  • Image Credit: Indian Autos Blog
Despite its position as a communist state, the People's Republic of China has taken a decidedly laissez-faire attitude towards copyright infringement. It's why, as evidenced in an old episode of Top Gear, you can buy a fake Omega, wear fake Ray-Bans, talk on a fake iPhone and drink at a fake Starbucks. It's also why Chinese automakers so shamelessly rip off the designs of western automobiles (exhibits A, B, C, D and E). Land Rover is the latest automaker to take exception to this practice.

The Indian-owned, British-made off-road brand is calling out the Chinese over the LandWind X7 which, like all good fakes, is a remarkably close approximation of the real thing, that goes for a lot less money. In this case, the Range Rover Evoque, which the X7 apes, sells for 40,000 pounds ($62,000 at today's rates) Autocar reports, while the Chinese version will retail for a meager 14,000 quid ($22,000).

With the X7 making its debut at the Guangzhou Motor Show, Land Rover Chief Executive Officer Dr. Ralf Speth opted to take a strong stance, issuing a resolute statement against LandWind's new SUV to Autocar:

"The fact that this kind of copying is ongoing in China is very disappointing. The simple principal is that it is not something that should happen; the intellectual property is owned by Jaguar Land Rover and if you break that IP then you are in breach of international regulations that apply around the world.

As a company we have invested heavily in China with our joint venture partner Chery. That commitment is based on a clear business plan, that allows us to hit our sales targets at clear prices. Anything that damages the potential profitability of our plant damages the integrity of those plans.

I will talk to our officials and I will talk to our partners at Chery to find a way around this situation. I cannot imagine Chinese officials will be happy at any actions that undermine the credibility of the country. What we have seen today is not correct."

According to Autocar, LandWind is a joint venture between two of China's larger automakers – Changan Auto and Jiangling Motors – which count Peugeot-Citroen and Ford as their JV partners, respectively. It's unclear how, or even if, any action by Land Rover could impact the two Chinese companies' partners.

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