• The Corvette Z06's aluminum frame will be produced in-house at Chevy's Bowling Green assembly plant. The chassis is lightweight, but incredibly robust — the automaker claims that it is "essentially unchanged" for use in the C7.R racecar.

  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Stripped of nearly all of its composite body panels, the chassis of the Z06 is nearly entirely constructed of aluminum alloy. Note that the integrated aluminum roll hoop and windshield surround, comprising the passenger safety cage, are completely constructed of lightweight aluminum. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • The right (and left) front clip have integrated brake scoops to force air into the back of the brakes for cooling. This cutaway Z06 is fitted with an optional ceramic brake package featuring six-piston aluminum monobloc calipers clamping down on lightweight rotors that are 15.5 inches in diameter up front. The front tires are 285/30ZR19. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • This rear three-quarter view provides a clean look at the left rear wheel and composite brake package. While two-piece steel rotors are standard, those who upgrade will find four-piston aluminum monobloc calipers clamping down on lightweight rotors that are 15.3 inches in diameter in the rear. The rear tires are 335/25ZR20. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • A clean side view of the C7 Corvette Z06. The extensive use of aluminum is evident, as the composite skin has been pulled back to the middle of the driver's door to reveal the bright, lightweight corrosion-resistant alloy. Note that the mass of the LT4 V8 engine is set very low and behind the front wheels — this configuration improves balance that pays dividends in the handling department. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • A nice, square shot of the front of the C7 Corvette Z06. The supercharged, 6.2-liter generates a lot of heat. As a result, nearly the entire front end is dedicated to scooping cold air through its angled water-to-air radiator. The engine air intake is angled towards the passenger side, where it breathes through the fender.
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • A square look at the rear of the new C7 Corvette Z06, with its quad-pipe exhaust and massive rear tires. The exhaust system's flappers, which control flow, are seen on the outboard pipes. Just outside that, mounted under the rear aluminum bumper, are the brackets for the exhaust hangers. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • This is the left front corner of the chassis, looking directly at the aluminum bumper reinforcement. Note the unique aluminum skid at the bottom, protecting the suspension and bottom of the engine. The plastic scoop, to the left of the image, feeds cold air into the engine's radiator. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Standing over the LT4, a 6.2-liter supercharged V8 with an Eaton supercharger. The engine breathes from the passenger side of the vehicle, with the airbox located just in front of the belt-driven alternator.  
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • A nice, clear view of the LT4, a 6.2-liter supercharged V8 producing "at least" 625 horsepower and 635 pound-feet of torque. The integrated 1.7-liter Eaton supercharger is in the "hot V" between the banks of cylinders. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Looking towards the front left wheel from the front of the Z06, the aluminum double-wishbone suspension is in plain sight (Chevrolet calls it a Short/Long Arm, or SLA, suspension). The large black cylinder, running down at an angle, is the magnetorheological damper that is part of the adaptive control suspension system. While the anti-roll bar (in black) is visible, it is nearly impossible to see the transverse composite leaf spring pressing against the lower control arm. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • The base of the windshield, or A-pillar, is a combination of aluminum alloys. The components are welded and bolted into place, with gussets to reinforce and reduce stress on the complex joints. The darker gray piece, to the left of the image, is the mounting bracket for the braking system's master cylinder.
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • This is a great view of the left front quarter panel, clearly showing the cast aluminum component (it has gridded lines on it) containing the suspension mounting points. The curved frame rail at the bottom is hydroformed aluminum, while the aluminum above is sheet that has been cut. The silver drum is the master cylinder, with a clear brake fluid reservoir on its top. Note the sticky Michelin tires.
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Hidden inside the right-front quarter panel, on the outside of the frame rail and behind the right front wheel, is the oil reservoir for the dry sump lubrication system. Open the hood, and you can see the yellow dipstick mounted on its lid.  
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Nearly everything in the image is shiny aluminum — but it's not that simple, as Chevrolet is using a variety of alloys depending on the strength and weight requirements. Most everything in this image is extruded, hydroformed or sheet that has been bent at specific angles. Note the entire windshield surround is aluminum! 

  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • This is a clean shot of the driver's compartment, with the finished seat, steering wheel and shifter in place. A boxed steel tube runs beneath the steering column, bolted to the vertical A-pillar on the left of the image. Note the substantial bracket holding the microsuede wheel in place.
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • The Z06 will arrive with the buyer's choice of either a GT or a Competition lightweight seat.The range-topping Competition seats are covered in microsuede and leather, and they feature magnesium frames to reduce mass. The completed seat is shown here with some of the yellow composite bodywork left intact. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Peering at the aluminum surrounding the compartment that will contain the large passenger-side airbag. A structural steel box-shaped pipe runs beneath the dashboard (some of the only steel in the Z06) because of packaging limitations. Note how it bolts into place on a welded bracket at the base of the A-pillar. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Looking at the chassis from the passenger side, without the seat installed. The extruded aluminum rails and firewall behind the passenger cabin are visible, as is the composite sandwich floor — there is no metal between the passengers and pavement! (Trivia: The new Boeing 787 uses a similar graphite-reinforced composite passenger cabin floor.) 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • The center tunnel has been cut open to reveal the carbon-fiber torque tube and driveshaft. While many other automakers have carbon-fiber driveshafts, Chevrolet is one of the first to utilize the material for its torque tube (the Stingray uses steel). The shifter mechanism, extending into the cabin, is seen at the top of the casing, with the twin exhaust pipes running below it (the torque tube is insulated from the heat with an aluminized wrap.) 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • This view, standing directly over the battery box, allows a clean view of the exhaust system as it works its way around the transmission and differential. Note the servo-operated flappers in the exhaust tubes, just aft of the axles, which control the flow of hot gasses. There are more flappers on on the outboard exhaust tips, also visible in the pictures. Lastly, this image clearly shows the cast aluminum frame holding the upper control arms and top of the Magnetic Selective Ride Control unit.
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • A nice shot of the quad exhaust tips coming off the steel mufflers (titanium was used on some C5 models, but its market price is too steep today). The aluminum beam at the bottom of the frame serves as the structural part of the rear bumper. Note the battery in the upper right corner, its weight being offset by the driver who sits on the left side of the chassis.
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • The eight-speed automatic transmission is flanked by steel tubes carrying hot exhaust to the rear mufflers. The finned aluminum differential casing is on the lower left of the frame.
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips
  • Intakes over each rear wheel feed cool air to radiators located in the rear quarter panels to help lower transmission and differential temperatures. Electric fans, pulling air through the core, boost airflow. 
  • Image Credit: Drew Phillips

Earlier this week at the Detroit Auto Show, Chevrolet introduced its all-new 2015 Corvette Z06 in showroom-glorious Velocity Yellow. But that wasn't the only example on the automaker's stand. Opposite the new C7.R racecar sat a completely exposed Z06 – methodically opened to bare all of its detailed mechanicals.

Vehicle cutaway displays offer fascinating insight to the hidden engineering typically buried beneath layers of body panels and glass, so we eagerly snapped and analyzed these pictures of the naked Z06 to share with you. The end result is a high-resolution photo gallery with two dozen images, each carefully captioned to describe the inner workings of Chevrolet's newest supercar. Click through our gallery for a closer look at the new king Corvette's inner workings, including its unique carbon-fiber torque tube, exhaust system and suspension engineering – it's an amazing effort.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 69 Comments
      TopGun
      • 1 Year Ago
      Thank-you Mr. Harley. Only car nuts would love stuff like this.
      Edsel
      • 1 Year Ago
      I would love to see a 1953 Corvette cutaway parked next to this one. Comparing the engineering and material technology between the two would be educational and highly fascinating.
      Gator
      • 1 Year Ago
      So awesome, fap, fap, fap. Very impressive GM
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      Shiftright
      • 1 Year Ago
      My mind is blown by how much car and tech you can get in a base '14 Vette for $55k, and the upcoming Alfa 4C
      FSLIV
      • 1 Year Ago
      LOVED the summaries under each picture. This was great journalism, informative.
      edselfanboy
      • 1 Year Ago
      These pictures will come in handy 50 years from now when my great-grandson is rebuilding one of the last great gasoline powered sports cars. By then the fuel-cell will rule and most cars will drive themselves I just hope the joy of driving will still be found with cars like this..
      Steve
      • 1 Year Ago
      I saw a Stingray in person for the first time, and the car looked even more stunning.
      bK
      • 1 Year Ago
      Thats one clean piece of metal.
      Avinash Machado
      • 1 Year Ago
      Nice.
      Cool Disco Dan
      • 1 Year Ago
      I saw one of those for the base model at the Baltimore GP and must have spent a total of 3 hours looking over in detail. They do a great job making them.
      Thom Sullivan
      • 1 Year Ago
      For a car that is intended to showcase the Z06's superiority, why would you put tires on it that are obviously worn out with poor camber settings?
        TopGun
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Thom Sullivan
        Hilarious! These Corvette posts sure bring out the Einsteins eh fellas?
        audisp0rta4
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Thom Sullivan
        I was going to comment on the "bald" tires as a joke, but Thom wins!
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