The devil is always in the details when it comes to industrial design. Sure, there are some ugly and disjointed consumer products that should never have been wrought upon the buying public, but the differences between most of the things we build and buy are subtle. Paying attention to the little stuff is important, especially in the auto industry, as it's the collection of these details that add up to produce truly memorable vehicles.

Which brings us to this cool design blog from Christian Annyas, where he's posted 24 black-and-white images of Chevrolet speedometer designs dating back to 1941. (The 2002 Monte Carlo SS Dale Earnhardt Signature Edition speedometer pictured above is not one of them.)

Tracing the evolution of the fonts and layout of all these speedos is interesting in itself, but Annyas seems to have a more pointed motivation – trashing digital speedometers. He pictures a single digital unit, from the Chevrolet Sonic, describing it as "not an ideal situation." To be fair, the Sonic's speedometer wouldn't be our choice if we had these to choose from, either. That honor would have to go to the trio of art deco 1940's Chevy truck designs Annyas selected.

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